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Can anyone recommend headjoints comparabel or a little better than the EC by yamaha.Has anyone tried the k series by yamaha can't find one?
 

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Last year I wanted something else. I had an EC but wanted something else so I tried a bunch of different headjoints. I tried a few sankyo’s, altus and a few other I can’t remember their names but they were around 1300 euros. To me, the EC was the best! Until I tried a little more expensive (I think was around 1800€)Arista headjoint. Last week I took the EC out and was blown away by it cause it was so easy to play and the sound was very equal in all registers. So my wife came home and had a listen and said that the Arista was a kind of 3 dimensional and the EC was very pleasing but just had this one directional groove to it. I think she was totally right. But again, this EC is very good.
I don’t know the K headjoint and it was not possible to try. But I do know yamaha and they keep surprising me.
 

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Can anyone recommend headjoints comparabel or a little better than the EC by yamaha.Has anyone tried the k series by yamaha can't find one?
Emerson Amercian Cut. Bruce Bailey normally has some of these. They're great.
 

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I would call Chris McKenna and ask his opinion. I have too think an airstream for most Yamaha Headjoints. He took my CY and recut the embouchure hole and it made a world of difference. It helped me grow until I outgrew the intermediate flute completely.
 

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The Emerson American cut is very powerful in the low end and was similar to the early LaFin models. Since they were discontinued about 10 years ago they don't come up too often. I only have some in silver plate ($200) but I do make one similar with the flat front for $750 with the engraved lip. Also I can do them with a gold riser.
The EC is pretty good but the K has become more popular.
 

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I'd suspect that how you're defining "better" would have a lot to do with the suggestions. I have an EC as well that has an easier response than the CY that I was playing before especially in the 3rd octave. I was trying flutes with Susan at Flutastic and found a couple of combinations I liked better than the EC that came with my YFL-684. I ultimately ended up with a Muramatsu GX III with whatever the stock headjoint is. This flute plays a bit brighter than my Yamaha but this particular GX responds much much easier for me in the 3rd octave as well as being easier to play in tune all around. She had several other Muramatsu flutes as well as a few very expensive $15k+ flutes that she graciously allowed me to try. For me the GX out played them all. I doubt that a really strong pro flute player would have made the same choice but who knows.

What you want out of the instrument and how you blow is going to determine what is better for you. There are some really terrible headjoints out there but once you get to a certain level it's more about personal preference not just a simple this is better than that.
 

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There were 2-3 threads discussing Yamaha head joints that are no longer on SOTW. Call me a conspiracy theory loon, but to me it is very clear that a LOT of old threads and posts on threads have been dissapeared. This is not at all the first time I have looked for old stuff that strangely no longer exists but was a great reference. Things ain't what they used to be here on SOTW.

About 8 years ago, after reading those aforementioned threads discussing the EC and Type K with a Yamaha 581h, my exact setup, the raves for the Type K were unanimous. The Type K blows the EC clear out of the water. Bigger, fatter, more colorful, more expressive, etc. So of course I had to find one. Duhhh.

Sure enough about 6 months later a mint cond. one popped up on eBay for a very reasonable price. I bought it and sure enough the rumors and reports were true. FABULOUS! Yes bigger, yes more color, yes more everything. Also a drop ( really just a hair) more resistant, but a just a tiny drop additional resistance... But man you get a BIG bang for your buck with that drop of extra resistance comes a whole ton of other incredible qualities. Too bad they are basically impossible to find. But if you do locate one, go for it. I'm really hooked on mine. Pete Thomas I believe also had one and raved and raved about it.
 

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You've got to be careful about recommendations in this forum. A writer could be anything from an accomplished player, over three octaves, to a doubler playing little more than 2 octaves, and needing a head that props up his incompetence in the low notes.
Also, choice of a flute head is a very personal thing.
Some focus on a mind-blowing big sound; others focus on flexibility of timbre. And of course there are many other parameters, such as ease of playing softly, true scale, minimised "weak" notes, pitch control in third octave, fussiness re embouchure, etc

Personally I think heads have come a long way way since the Emerson American cut but that depends on just what you are looking for.
Some players would love the pro Haynes head that I learnt on 6 decades ago, but I find that very disappointing compared with modern offerings.

There is a wide choice of makers in the very expensive range but value/wow for money, many players have been impressed by the EC. And as LateNiteSax says, in another discussion the Y cut head emerged as a worthy contender.

Like KeithL, I also consider the head on the basic EX and GX Muramatsu flutes to be a worthy as a well-known and respected yardstick especially for flexible timbre - James Galway played one of these as his practice flute for quite a few years - so try one of those and compare with the Yamahas for how they suit YOU! That is what matters. But be aware that YOUR prefered parameters may change as you become more accomplished.

I've forgotten the name, but there is a flute specialist company that sends heads on trial before you buy. Could it be Flute World?
 

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I like heads that are more square than round with a long flat front edge and undercut.
Like my Dana Sheridan.
 

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I recently bought a Dana Sheridan. I really like it.
But it may not be everybody's cup of tea.
And expensive!
 

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I recently bought a Dana Sheridan. I really like it.
But it may not be everybody's cup of tea.
And expensive!
True.
I went to a flute convention with his brother and tried 6 of his heads,
They were amazingly the same, so I bought the least expensive (still $1450.00).
It's the best one I've owned. Really clear tone and easy to get an edgy tone, especially in the low notes.
 

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Mine was this year, $1700, but by the time it arrived here with exchange rate, shipping, tax and customs it was $3176!!

"...They were amazingly the same..."
That's encouraging. I always wonder what happens to the relative-duds of hand-crafted items, especially for flutes, when the hand-crafting of the embouchure hole is almost everything.

It makes me wonder even more when a top brand flute maker puts out a cheaper model with Chinese or Taiwanese body and local, USA, supposedly top pro head.
What happens to the not quite so good heads that the apprentice makes. I doubt that they are melted down for another try.
Still cynically wondering.

I'm still convinced that Selmer used to send their most badly adjusted saxes to the antipodes, with keys wedged closed, supposedly hoping they would magically adjust themselves in transit.
 

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Mine was this year, $1700, but by the time it arrived here with exchange rate, shipping, tax and customs it was $3176!!

"...They were amazingly the same..."
That's encouraging. I always wonder what happens to the relative-duds of hand-crafted items, especially for flutes, when the hand-crafting of the embouchure hole is almost everything.

It makes me wonder even more when a top brand flute maker puts out a cheaper model with Chinese or Taiwanese body and local, USA, supposedly top pro head.
What happens to the not quite so good heads that the apprentice makes. I doubt that they are melted down for another try.
Still cynically wondering.

I'm still convinced that Selmer used to send their most badly adjusted saxes to the antipodes, with keys wedged closed, supposedly hoping they would magically adjust themselves in transit.

Quality and consistency are everything.
Dana is a fanatic about tolerances. He has retired so your head is rare and getting mores so.
 

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If the seller will not allow a trial on a head, don't buy it. Heads are very overpriced. You can still buy NOS or take off heads in sterling for about $150. The biggest issue with trials is fitment to your flute.
 

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I have had an Emerson American head, two EC Yamaha heads and briefly a type K. My first flute was a very used Emerson with the American head. I picked up a used EC head that I used on a Demedici 911 flute for quite some time. I tried the type K and really liked it on that flute, so I picked that up as well. Ultimately the headjoint search on that flute was misguided and I ended up selling that and buying a great old YFL561 heavy wall that came with an EC head. In comparing that EC to the type K I felt it was a better match for me and the flute. The type K was colorful but something about this EC head is really special, and I didn’t feel the first EC head I had played at all close to how this one plays, so I sold the type K and have been happily using the EC that came with this flute since!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Found an Emerson symphony cut on Ebay supposedly new which is strange but well see what it sounds like
 

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I have some of the Symphony cut models as they were sold off really cheap when Emerson stopped production. They are a bit like the traditional but with more resistance. I think mine came from Quinn for about $150. I use them on used flutes where the head is damaged.
 
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