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Discussion Starter #1
Cant find much info about this model , how does it compare to the later committee ?
Looks like it is the lowest priced committee ..
 

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It was Martin's pro model at the time, so it's a quality horn, but it was made a long time ago (1936-1939). It's cheaper than the later Martins because later models had improved ergonomics, intonation, etc.

The same principle applies to most vintage horns. The cheapest models are usually the oldest ones and they're cheaper because later models were improvements on the earlier designs. This holds true for most brands until about the mid-forties through the fifties or so when many companies are reckoned to have reached their peaks and produced their best models before declining. Of course, this is why those particular models (King Super 20, Martin Committee III, Conn "Naked Lady", Buescher TH&C, Selmer SBA and Mark VI) are so expensive compared to the rest.

Of course, we're talking about generalizations and perceptions here. You never really know how good a given instrument is until you actually play it. There are plenty of horns floating around of highly-regarded vintages that were played to death and need to be overhauled.
 

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and add:

http://themartinstory.net/version7/models-committee.php

There's a fair amount of info on these. Also called Handcraft Committees, also called Searchlights, also called Mars Invasions....

Good horns, I really like these horns. IMHO they feel better under the fingers than a III.

Yes, relatively speaking, the least expensive of the Comms...but not due to lack of quality by any means.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It was Martin's pro model at the time, so it's a quality horn, but it was made a long time ago (1936-1939). It's cheaper than the later Martins because later models had improved ergonomics, intonation, etc.

The same principle applies to most vintage horns. The cheapest models are usually the oldest ones and they're cheaper because later models were improvements on the earlier designs. This holds true for most brands until about the mid-forties through the fifties or so when many companies are reckoned to have reached their peaks and produced their best models before declining. Of course, this is why those particular models (King Super 20, Martin Committee III, Conn "Naked Lady", Buescher TH&C, Selmer SBA and Mark VI) are so expensive compared to the rest.

Of course, we're talking about generalizations and perceptions here. You never really know how good a given instrument is until you actually play it. There are plenty of horns floating around of highly-regarded vintages that were played to death and need to be overhauled.
This makes absolutely sense, thanks ...
 

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I had a Handcraft Committee Alto the summer before last and it was the bomb. Beautiful sax and better than the Chu Alto I had had for years. The only alto I have owned that I have liked more is my Buescher TT series 4, but the Martin is probably the better choice for playing Rock and loud bar music of that type. Never have had a chance to play the tenor of that series but imagine it to be really great too. You can't go wrong with one of these IMO, and the prices are lower than the later models.
 

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Searchlights are great pro horns. they are not going to limit your development or performance. the fact that they can be had for so little make them a steal.
 

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I have an unusual Comm I that actually says Comm I on it and is not the Search Light engraving. Looks more like a Comm II. Playability is fantastic. Lower C# requires a bit of pressure but was improved by having Jack Finucane at Boston Sax Shop.
 

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Is it the Lion and Crown with Martin spelled in a vertical manner? If so, it may be a II that has a missing digit.
 

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I have an unusual Comm I that actually says Comm I on it and is not the Search Light engraving. Looks more like a Comm II. Playability is fantastic. Lower C# requires a bit of pressure but was improved by having Jack Finucane at Boston Sax Shop.
What's the bell rim diameter? The 1 is noticeably smaller than other Martins.
 

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One of the best horns I ever played. The left hand table is much more comfy than the CommIII. The left hand thumb rest is the best one of any horn.
 

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My guess is that it is a Comm I type with engraving like the military ordered, not so fancy. Whatever it is, the horn looks nice and it the pads are good decent buy if under $1,000.
 

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This is a high quality professional instrument. In my judgement it's better made in many ways than the equivalent Conns. I have an alto of this type.

I suspect that the reason for relatively lower prices is that it has solid nickel alloy keys which look superficially like the nickel plated keys of student instruments.

Ergonomically it's basically identical to a Conn, Buescher, or King of the same vintage. The Committee III ("The" Martin) isn't really much different in that regard. I do dig the adjustable RH thumbhook.
 

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I have one of these. These Comm I were made parallel with the Comm II. A 128XXX horn (-38). I bought it ready-to-play back in 1996. Oversized sterling silver resonators. Sings very well.
 
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