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Discussion Starter #1
I've created a new website devoted to the recordings of the Columbia Saxophone Sextette (1916-1921). Capitalizing on the success of the Six Brown Brothers, the group featured top players like Ross Gorman (later of the Whiteman band) and likely Rudy Wiedoeft.

Complete audio files and some interesting images are there now - I hope to flesh out more info about the recordings as time permits.

http://www.dws.org/saxtette

Hope you enjoy!

David Lovrien
Plano, TX
 

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Fantastic! As a big 6BB fan (and recreator), I've always wanted to hear some of these and now I can.

I'll throw you a geek question: Was record A2194 held up till 1919, even tho A2195-2205 presumably came out in '17?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't know for sure. Comparing the matrix numbers to the actual record numbers, Bullfrog Blues and Swanee Ripples were recorded together in November 1916, then Bullfrog Blues was redone in 1919. I have two copies of this record and both of them have the 1919 Bullfrog. Seems likely that the redone track was substituted for some reason (master destroyed, something wrong with performance, etc.) in 1919, but I have no proof that the 1916 Bullfrog was ever issued.
 

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D on't know myself. The release number would argue it was, but releases can appear out of sequence.

Anyway, I really enjoy their playing and the quality of the sound. Good work by Columbia and you.
 

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this is awesome. this just adds depth to the overall picture if you wanted to study the history of articulation. i'm getting a french rivera vibe listening to 'waiting'... not that i'm going out to get a collection of steamboat whistle/hooting/honking sounds after listening to 'ting-ling toy'.
 

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David, did you ever turn up anything more about Fred Blondell or Billy Markwith?

And another thought about that Bullfrog Blues A2194. It might have been brought out in '17, then pulled from release early for some reason. That would make the original a real rarity.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
There is a recital program image on the site listing personnel and neither of them are listed. I know Bruce Vermazen has more info but I don't know that the puzzle has ever really been pieced together. But just listening to the tracks it's clear that the same lineup wasn't used for every track - just listen to "Oh My Goodness" and that nanny-goat vibrato. Sounds a lot like Tom Brown to my ear (even though that doesn't seem likely) and much different from the lead players on most of the other tracks. Fascinating stuff!
 

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IIRC from Vermazen, Billy Markwith subbed in with the Browns on many occasions. So he clearly had plenty of chance to learn Tom's style.
 

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All you old time sax group fans should see this sight if you haven't showing the Kitkat Rascals Sax group playing live (you can easily hear when the go on and of mike as they march around) This video is a real treasure from as late as 1937 would you believe:

http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=36583

Too bad there is no film extent of the Brown Brothers or other vintage ensembles
 

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Whoa!!! Very impressive.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I have an old email from Bruce where he mentions "an ad in Variety for Nov. 18, 1921 (p. 35), signed by Harry A. Yerkes, in which he says that the Broadway Saxo-Harmonists are impostors, once hired by him for a road engagement, but not the same as the original Col. Sax. Sex. Yerkes names as sometime members of the real Sextette Rudy Wiedoeft, Ross Gorman, Nathan Glantz, and Bennie Krueger, along with "others, now famous." He says he's going to prosecute Fred Blondell."

Some interesting in-fighting was obviously going on, and if we knew the full story, some of our guesses on personnel would probably be laughable.
 

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More about the Kit Kat Saxophone Rascals

Someone over at bassic-sax.ca wrote in about the Kit Kats awhile back. 4 of them were from the Tom Katz Saxophone Band, begun in Sydney in 1927 when the Six Brown Brothers turned down a return Australian engagement.

The Tom Katz relocated to London in 1934 and were quite successful on the "halls" until '36, when their sop and bass players left and took the name with them. The rest became the Kit Kats, with 2 English players, and broke up for good in 1940.

The tune titles have been discovered too.
Colonel Bogey, the march favorite, we all know of course.
The bass sax features on In Cellar Cool, a German drinking song that goes back to 1875.
The final quickstep number is Whistling Rufus, a cakewalk piano hit of 1899.
 

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This is why I check Sax on the Web every day. Because of people like Paul and blogs like the one Helen (bassic-sax) maintains, I learn a lot. Thank you!
 

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Re: More about the Kit Kat Saxophone Rascals

Someone over at bassic-sax.ca wrote in about the Kit Kats awhile back. 4 of them were from the Tom Katz Saxophone Band, begun in Sydney in 1927 when the Six Brown Brothers turned down a return Australian engagement.

The Tom Katz relocated to London in 1934 and were quite successful on the "halls" until '36, when their sop and bass players left and took the name with them. The rest became the Kit Kats, with 2 English players, and broke up for good in 1940.

The tune titles have been discovered too.
Colonel Bogey, the march favorite, we all know of course.
The bass sax features on In Cellar Cool, a German drinking song that goes back to 1875.
The final quickstep number is Whistling Rufus, a cakewalk piano hit of 1899.
Bass Sax solo is "Im tiefen Keller (down in the deep cellar)
 

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It had many titles and many lyrics in German and English - Drinking, Drinking, Drinking was another well known title.

It was a bass singer's specialty, just the thing for when some good Rhine wine relaxes the nerves and the vocal cords.

Got the date wrong BTW. It was really written in 1802.

In cellar cool I sit me here
Upon a pipe at leisure
And with a cheerful mind I order
Wine in right good measure
The tapster draws a mighty glass
When he beholds me winking
I hold my cup high in the air,
when I'm drinking, drinking, drinking.

Poor me a thirsty demon plagues,
But I shall surely fright him,
and with my wineglass in my hand
I'll up and bravely fight him
The whole world seems so rosy red
and ever to my thinking
I'd do no harm to any man
when I'm drinking, drinking,
D - R - I - N - K - I - N - G.


:drunken:
 

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