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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My researches are near complete. With your help - contributions, photos, questiones - it will be the complete story of a really exciting chapter of the Holton history.

There will be an improved distinction and description of models/series and a separate serial number chart on those 'COLLEGIATE's which cannot be looked up in the Holton Serial Number Chart:

http://vintage.saxontheweb.net/Holton.html.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The first COLLEGIATE saxophones were completely different from Holton's other saxophone production. What was their origin? Let's have a look at R. Develli's explanation:

"Patrick J. Healy died in 1905, ending his 16-year reign as company president. His son, Paul J. Healy served in that role from 1911-1915. The last family member at the helm was Marquette A. Healy, president from 1921-1925 when many of the "Own Make" mandolins were made. Later in the 1920s, Lyon & Healy evolved from an instrument builder to a musical wholesaler. In 1928, Tonk Bros. bought the wholesale division. That same year, the J. R. Stewart Co. acquired the machinery and patent rights for the Lyon & Healy fretted instruments. (They did their best to produce instruments built to the same quality standards as Lyon & Healy but were bankrupt by 1930, about five months after the stock market crashed.) Also in 1928, the Holton Co. took over Lyon & Healy's band instrument production. So, by the end of that year, only harps continued to be made by Lyon & Healy - as they are to this day. The name still commands respect and most of the leading orchestras in the country have Lyon & Healy harps, which list for as much as $45,000!"

Source: http://bellsouthpwp.net/r/d/rdevelli/Doug Unger Lyon Healy Mandolin b.htm
 

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So THAT Collegiate you posted above...wasn't made at the Holton factory, or was it ?

I ask because I have the similar soprano, serial 201,8xx..and I'd really like to know if it actually came from the Holton plant.

If it did, did they just adopt the L & H serial numbering system at the very beginning...before switching to their own ????
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So THAT Collegiate you posted above...wasn't made at the Holton factory, or was it ?
Within my following postings I will clear up that mystery (and some more).

I ask because I have the similar soprano, serial 201,8xx..and I'd really like to know if it actually came from the Holton plant.
Explaining the matter above I'll include the answer. May I post the reverse side of that soprano above?;)

If it did, did they just adopt the L & H serial numbering system at the very beginning...before switching to their own ????
Holton did not adopt the system, but there was a Bb soprano (or two or three ..) already stamped by the former company ... . And there were some baritones ... one of them was already engraved with the 'Lyon&Healy' logo ... . You certainly will be surprised, what they did with that bari!
 

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.......:banghead:.....

...you are enjoying this...aren't you ????? :TGNCHK:


...I now eagerly await the revelation of the mystery.....;)

...if you posted the reverse side of the horn above...would I recognize something about it.....??????:shock:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
...you are enjoying this...aren't you ?????
I'm sorry, it's not my intention to let you wait. What I'm going to explain here is new insight, partly contrary to common opinion. So I try to present the stuff in a scientific correct manner instead of telling just an opinion. That's hard work. I hope you will enjoy that, too.

...if you posted the reverse side of the horn above...would I recognize something about it.....??????:shock:
I'm pretty sure you will recognize something about it ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I now eagerly await the revelation of the mystery....
I think your questiones (#4) are essentially answered in following posts in thread 'Holton Saxophone; Serial number registry':

# 163
# 505

More detailes will follow soon.
 

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I'm sorry, it's not my intention to let you wait.
It's OK, Felix....'immediate gratification' is so...so....1980's.....;)

We are in a new era, now....

So...I would understand you to be saying that the body was made by Couturier (or is it L & H ?), but the horn was completed by Holton, after they took over production of saxes.....

Would that be correct ?
 

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alto: 82Zii/Medusa/Supreme, tenor: Medusa, bari: b-901, sop, sc-990
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I try to present the stuff in a scientific correct manner instead of telling just an opinion. That's hard work. I hope you will enjoy that, too.
Well, i for one will enjoy it!
 

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I can't wait for the conclusion. I bet Frank Holton's butler did it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Unfortunately I have to take a break for about five weeks.:(

Have a good time.

Felix
 

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Mr. LaPorte- The Polizei are looking for you.
 

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By 1920, Frank Holton realised the soldering adhesion of his saxophone keys to the saxophone body was causing complaints. Small cracks were opening, resulting in very hard to detect leaks. Sales were slipping. He went to his head metallurgist, Poindexter James, who concocted a special hard solder formula, consisting of silver, tin, antimony , and lead. This successfully cured the problem and Holton sales soared thoughout the 1920s. Mr. Holton proudly named this brilliant soldering process after its inventor. It became known as the ..... James Bond.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
COLLEGIATE I

List of Contents

1. Like comin' home - the creation of the 'COLLEGIATE'

2. A New Logo

3. The very first: A Soprano

4. 'Stencilled' - not stamped: The Clarinet

5. The saxophone with the two names - The Alto

6. The lowest numbered 'Collegiate': The Tenor

7. The Mysterious Baritone

8. 'Revelation' instead of 'Collegiate' - Holton's surprising idea

9. 'American Beaufort' - Sale Or The End Of A Great Idea

With this list I want to give the theme some structure. Improvising over it,
I would like to tell something about my researches and thoughts about that hardly noticed chapter of Holton history. I will take my time.

Felix
 

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...are you familiar with the televison series "LOST" ?

I don't know if you guys get it over there.

You know, it started out being very, very popular..and it was very intriguing for the first 2 seasons...pretty well written, decent acting. But as time stretched on and on, season after season...the plots started not making as much sense, the writers got sloppy with the characters...slowly viewership dropped off because fans were no longer willing to suspend their disbelief. Apparent explanations would seem to be leading somewhere. Secrets seemed about to be revealed. Then...the writers would just drop the entire theme...just leave the fans cold...no explanation. No direction.

Many fans felt that the writers were manipulating the audience over time. This is understandable...as people will only suspend their disbelief willingly for a period of time, in order to get the thrill of the payoff....

Now, with this show, viewers began feeling like they were being strung along when there was really no sense, no explanation as to the characters' actions and intentions, and really no secret to be revealed, no resolution forthcoming....

On top of this, the network occasionally would air it at irreguar intervals. At first it was so popular and compelling that they managed to pull this off....the show would appear for 3 or 4 episodes, then not be shown for a few weeks, then come back with a bunch of repeats ...then wouldn't be shown again for a few weeks. Then a few new episodes would air again, then the same pattern would start over again....

As these dynamics continued...... interest waned. :|

As interest waned, viewership dropped off.

As viewership dropped off, the quality of the show also tanked....

As the quality of the show tanked and viewers stopped following it with interest.....well...you can imagine....

...

...I dunno exactly what made me think of that..... :TGNCHK:
 
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