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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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She was one of a kind and will be deeply missed. Journalism and the movements for having women and minorities in leadership positions benefited greatly from her leadership.

May her memory be a blessing.
 

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Insightful & trustworthy. A voice of reason. We need more journalists like that. She will be remembered. Hopefully her example will inspire others.
 

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Insightful & trustworthy. A voice of reason. We need more journalists like that. She will be remembered. Hopefully her example will inspire others.
The death of journalism has been a contributing factor in so many problems we're facing in the US, and I imagine in many other countries, too. I hope that there are brilliant young people who are inspired to do great journalism, but I know for a fact that many high school and college counselors discourage students from entering the field. The reasons are obvious: in the new economy, where "content" is supposed to be free, "content producers" (writers, musicians, graphic artists, etc) have a hard time getting paid for their work.

There were problems with what we now call "legacy media": the big newspapers, the news magazines, the major television networks. But they at least supplied a baseline of generally agreed upon facts that served as a basis for debate. Now, they're gone, or if they still exist, they are shadows of their former selves, and we live in a "post truth" society, where opinions and ideologies rule and facts are barely relevant. That's a trend that is not going to end well.
 

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The death of journalism has been a contributing factor in so many problems we're facing in the US, and I imagine in many other countries, too. I hope that there are brilliant young people who are inspired to do great journalism, but I know for a fact that many high school and college counselors discourage students from entering the field. The reasons are obvious: in the new economy, where "content" is supposed to be free, "content producers" (writers, musicians, graphic artists, etc) have a hard time getting paid for their work.

There were problems with what we now call "legacy media": the big newspapers, the news magazines, the major television networks. But they at least supplied a baseline of generally agreed upon facts that served as a basis for debate. Now, they're gone, or if they still exist, they are shadows of their former selves, and we live in a "post truth" society, where opinions and ideologies rule and facts are barely relevant. That's a trend that is not going to end well.

Thank you for this post. It does appear to be an international phenomenon.
 

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Very sad. I always trusted NPR's "Ask Cokie" segment to help me understand American political history better.
 

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I was so sad to hear this today. I always loved her. She was smart, insightful, articulate, honest and gifted journalist. While many remembrances talk about what a great female journalist she was, she was a fantastic, period. She could hold her own among the greats any day. By all accounts she was also a wonderful friend, mother, wife and friend.
 
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