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Distinguished SOTW Member
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My 1955 Conn 6M is a fine player, and I really like it, nearly as much as my 1967 Mark VI. However, it has nickel keys, and some of them are "cloudy" rather than having a shiny finish. Most of them still shine well after 52 years, but a few, not necessarily where fingers lie most naturally, are cloudy.

What, if anything, can I do to reclaim the shiny finish on these keys, short of replating them?

Thanks,

Sax Magic
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member and Forum Contributor 20
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My tech has buffed them lightly on a buffing wheel and they looked like new.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member and Forum Contributor 20
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I would presume so, but I wasn't there for that and didn't ask about it.
 

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What, if anything, can I do to reclaim the shiny finish on these keys, short of replating them?

If you want to do it by hand you can try a "Miracle Cloth" (Google it) rub down the keys and finish with a silver polish cloth. Does a nice job.

Buffing will require repadding unless done with a Air buff or dremel tool. It will still be a messy job.

Carl
 

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Hagerty Silversmiths metal polish. comes in blue spray cans, or 4Oz tins. Also has a tarnish inhibitor. Pricey, but works great. Spray on, wait a minute and wipe off.
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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It IS abrasive. Some polishes are more abrasive than others, but most are abrasive, especially if they obviously have a powder component. Most of the polishing is done by abrasion.
 
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