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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2017
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The game has changed. Years ago the pickup was the only real option. These days you have multi-fx processors with phantom power and XLR ins and outs...they work just fine with a clip-on mic and have the added benefit of a closer reproduction of your sax sound. There's still nothing wrong with using a pickup - it's just a bit more of a hassle, but there are tons of gear-heads still using all kinds of vintage FX and more. There's still cats hualing around B3's with Leslies...

A lot of it is what we grow comfortable with. My studio hasn't changed significantly this century other than my DAW. I'd rather spend the time playing music than on the learning curve presented by new gear...
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
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The game has changed. Years ago the pickup was the only real option. These days you have multi-fx processors with phantom power and XLR ins and outs...they work just fine with a clip-on mic and have the added benefit of a closer reproduction of your sax sound.
They work fine but sound awful IMHO. Al the guys using Digitech and TC junk...Yuk. Cold and digital.
 

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I recently attended a workshop led by Skerik. He uses a board full of various effects pedals which can do looping, reverb, distortion, octave doubling, and perhaps some others that I forgot. At least for this workshop, he was just using a conventional mic (and not using a pickup).
A pickup or conventional mic can both work depending on your setup/sound. Skerik plays with a great band who are sensitive to volume, dynamics, and his use of effects. So it's not typically a problem for him to run a clip-on. Frequently, with very loud stage volumes, you get into situations where your wah pedal will cause feedback, delay effects pick up extra "trash" from your mic bleed, and tracking-effects like harmonizers, auto-wahs, and octave-pedals don't work as well (or work at all) because of the bleed. A pickup will eliminate a lot of these issues.

Also, it seems the modern pickups are much more hi-fi than the stuff from the 70s, unless you are going for that vintage sound. The new pickups produce a much broader spectrum.

I'm working on a setup where I have a pickup and clip-on mic, with the ability to cross-fade the two at any time with an expression pedal. Best of both worlds! Like warpx suggested, use a pickup for effects and mic for the horn. With this setup I can also blend a touch of "clean" sound into the effects side. I'm planning on posting some video/faq when I get the pedalboard finished.

Cheers!
 

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Distinguished SOTW member, musician, technician &
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There's still nothing wrong with using a pickup - it's just a bit more of a hassle
For me it is less hassle, so I guess it depends.

They work fine but sound awful IMHO. Al the guys using Digitech and TC junk...Yuk. Cold and digital.
Hmm... I use a Line 6 multieffect. It weighs about 1.5kg. If I wanted the same in "analogue" effects I don't want to imagine the weight, I guess at least 20kg and probably a lot more. But if I wanted exactly the same, it doesn't exist in "analogue".
 
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