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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,
i just dug my old sax out of storage, and the piece is NASTY!

It's gold and smelly and yeeeegghhh!
What is the best way to clean it up? --don't care if it shines, just want it sanitary..

I was thinking of letting it sit over night in a hot bowl of soapy (dishwasher soap) water, then scrubbing with a sponge the next day.

Any suggestions? thanks
 

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I found soaking the mouthpiece is Coke (yes Coke or any Soda) for an hour or so. It will be as clean as new when it's done.
 

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Not Kidding!!!! It may not be sanitary but it will be clean.
 

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Don't use hot water if your mouthpiece is hard rubber-- it will turn a cloudy greenish color which isn't a big deal, but looks weird to me. You can use hot water with no issues on metal mouthpieces.
 

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Using hot water for hard rubber can warp the facing. It can also make it smell like a burnt tire which isn't too pleasant.

Regarding using sodas: I assume the acid eats away at all the gunk and stuff. I've heard of people using diluted hydrochloric acid to clean mouthpieces because of the same principle. You just have to be sure not to not leave it in there too long. You don't want the acid to start eating away at the mouthpiece.
 

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For my metal mouthpieces, I've always used warm water. I haven't had to use soap yet, because I usually wash them a few times a week (my lips usually leave dry, flaky skin behind on the mouthpiece, so I try to keep it clean for the sake of appearances). I wouldn't have any trouble using soap, though.
 

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A mixture of vinegar and luke warm water will remove all the white gunk on any type of mouthpiece without any damage to it.
Use a old toothbrush to get the crude out under running cool tap water.
 

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blindside398 said:
Can't believe no one has said mouthwash yet. It works wonders =]
But then the mouthpiece smells like mouthwash, which is weird. Generally speaking, if my mouthpiece has anything but a more or less neutral smell/taste, it's time to clean it!
 

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dirty said:
But then the mouthpiece smells like mouthwash, which is weird. Generally speaking, if my mouthpiece has anything but a more or less neutral smell/taste, it's time to clean it!

Haha, I love the smell of mouthwash :D.



I once had a mouthpiece that smelled like playdoh (custom baffle), wetness (weird smell LOL), and cinnamon toothpaste!


I chose to try and clean an experiment the WRONG way :D. Luckily it doesn't taste or smell horrendous anymore, but BOY was it bad for about two weeks :p
 

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half diet coke and half water. Works on brass and rubber. Watch out for alcohol based mouthwashes on hard rubber pieces.
 

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Put it in a glass of water and add 2 denture cleaner tablets. Let it sit for a few hours. It works, really. Also great for cleaning crystal and glassware.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thats a lot of good, and odd suggestions.. thank you all!

I now have it resting in a vat of hot water, mixed with coke, mouthwash, vinegar and toothpaste.

It has turned a toxic fluerescent green though!!!
 

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Maybe you want to add some hydrogen peroxide for good measure. Someone mentioned that you can sanitize reeds with it. Seems like it would be good for mpcs too.
 

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Thanks for the tips on this thread. I bathed mine in vinegar for about an hour then wiped it with toothpaste and a cloth and it looks brand new!
 

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It might help to specify whether it's HR or metal. As some of the posts above suggest, it makes a difference in terms of what is or isn't a good idea in the cleaning process.
 

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Toothpaste, a soft toothbrush and cold water.
I even scrub reeds this way on occasion if there looking a little funky.
This seems safe on metal or rubber or plastic pieces.
 
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