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I just bought a tenor that was obviously a bar horn and is gunky in some spots mostly under those hard to get to spots like under the rods but elsewhere as well.

What products should I use to clean gunk and spit off the body, and secondly; what product should I use to remove dirt from the pads?

Thanks
 

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What about taking it apart and giving it an ultrasonic bath?

I've done that before and gotten great results.

Sent from my LGUS997 using Tapatalk
 

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I just bought a tenor that was obviously a bar horn and is gunky in some spots mostly under those hard to get to spots like under the rods but elsewhere as well.

What products should I use to clean gunk and spit off the body, and secondly; what product should I use to remove dirt from the pads?

Thanks
Best to disassemble to clean otherwise you’ll end up knocking some corks off somewhere. Not to mention many cleaners are water base and not good on hinge rods/screws and such.
Does the thing play in tune or at all...Dirt removal on pads?? How nasty is it, post a picture.
Consider sending it out for a good Clean oil adjustment.
 

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After disassembly I give lacquered saxes a bath in lukewarm water and Dawn dish soap scrubbing with a soft brush in between the keys. It is then rinsed with clear water and dried using an air compressor. That is followed by polishing with Pledge Lemon Furniture Polish. An easy way I have found to do this is to put on a pair of white cotton gloves and spray one hand with the Pledge. After rubbing with the wet glove you then polish the area with the dry glove. It generally takes a few sets of gloves to do the job. Keycups are cleaned using the same method (without the bath of course). I have had good success cleaning pads with Dr's Pad Cleaner. I second the recommendation to take the sax in for a professional Clean Oil and Adjust. The tech will do all of the above and also clean and lubricate the keys and do a "play condition" as well.
 

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you can do it..lay it on a towel with a good lamp over it, get a magnifier if you want..start at the top..go slow and careful, use clean water and plenty of Q-tips, a soft small paintbrush will help too. I use tiny cotton cloth strips for places on the tube..Go carefully around your corks and felts and be meticulous, wash and Q-Tip dry as you go, oiling along the way =, Will take a couple hrs.. finish and shine it with some Pledge:whistle:

Little leather conditioner on a dry pad works too..
 

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If it's real funky, with hard caked on gook under the key rods, I agree that disassembly is best. If you aren't comfortable with that, or if it's just dirty, and not grimy, gritty, hard dirty, then you can do it with q-tips and thin rag strips (tear up an old t-shirt) to get under the the keys and around the posts, but it will take a while :)

For the pads, you can use a commercial product or you can use naptha - AKA lighter fluid. If pads are dry use a small amount of leather conditioner, or neats foot oil or something like that. Ferree's sells something called "Pad Dope" that is good. But if a pad (like the low Eb or palm D) is really crusty, better have it replaced.

The lighter fluid is good for cleaning the body and keys too, but I'd start with water - that is, dampen a rag or q-tip.

Hope this helps. Is the horn any good???? Enquiring minds want to know :)
 

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There's no easy way around what has already been stated. I've found that careful application of a non-issue abrasive car wax will prevent verdigris and red rot from forming on bare brass. As far as lacquer is concerned, you're best treating it with soap and water. Yeah, that requires total disassembly.
 

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Of course dis-assembly is the proper way. But many times I've cleaned some pretty nasty horns on the kitchen table. A small cap with a bit of dawn would work on a Q-tip too.
 

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I just bought a tenor that was obviously a bar horn and is gunky in some spots mostly under those hard to get to spots like under the rods but elsewhere as well.
Do we get to see a before and after picture?
 

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My favorite cleaning/preservation products are Meguiar Cleaner/Polish (find this at your car parts dealer such as Pep Boys) and Runyon Pad Dope (music store or similar).

I’ve been using Meguiars products for about 40 years. I first used them when working in a guitar shop for final cleanup and polish there. It not only cleans, but protects against water spots.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Of course dis-assembly is the proper way. But many times I've cleaned some pretty nasty horns on the kitchen table. A small cap with a bit of dawn would work on a Q-tip too.
I did this exact thing
 

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BTW since people asked, its a B&S 2001 in gold lacquer. I spent 2 1/2 hours cleaning it with dawn and q-tips and a sax maintenance cloth. So far so good but it may end up needing an overhaul because it is obvious that the previous owner drank alcohol and smoked while playing this horn so although I was able to dissipate most of stink, the pads are super dirty although they are still supple and sealing.

Its a great match to my other three B&S's
 

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Did you actually disassemble it? I thoroughly recommend it as a learning process for anyone.

Do not in stages, dip your toe in the water by removing the palm keys. After that it is kind of in at the deep end as its basically the whole right stack. But by then you get the process and the necessity of keeping all the keys ands screws organised. makes a lot of sense to take photos as you go along.

But once you have disassembly, cleaning is so much easier, safer and more effective.
 

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I DO recommend that you do it in stages.
Maybe that is what PT meant to say.
All of the palm. side, pinky keys can be removed and replaced by the compleat beginner.

The main stacks take a bit more commitment. But if you want a really clean horn, you need to have all of the keys off.

I use a large towel on a large table, and set the keys and screws out in the same positions they go on the horn. Makes reassembly easier.

Leave the springs on !!

+10 for Meguiar's. Makes your sax stay cleaner for longer.
 

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Lay it out in the order of disassembly. Be deliberate.



Enjoy getting to know your horn.

P.S. You don’t need calipers. I was measuring my tone holes for a custom set of resonators.
 

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Dis-assembly is great once you've done it a few times. otherwise first time is daunting. Plus there's always a difficult screw or linkage to deal with..I did my first VI tenor a long time ago out of sheer necessity, you can lay it out, start slow and take it apart..Lay the pieces in a line and follow it back,.... and (haha cross your fingers) , it goes back together, anyway it should be clean after that, then take it to the shop for a final adjust..

I started doing this with my a VI tenor a hundred yrs ago simply because I could not afford a big shop bill, and my horn needed a thorough cleaning..lately I still clean/polish my '68 silver VI tenor myself, then I'll take it in for pro regulation.

Funny today on the Gig my VI choked bad, I recently had it restored, I ordered tenor madness HiPo pads/resos, Kessler final set-up, this thing should be flawless, but something was wrong..middle range would not respond at all..

Finally I tweaked my octave key, it wasn't shutting right. (???)

I don't know how it possibly could have gotten bent out of adjustment. I am very careful with my equipment. But man. no play at all second register, this horn in the last 35 yrs never did this to me..

Anyway. I'm going nuts and stuck playing flute trying to figure out *** is happening. so what the hell I see the octave key looks like it ain't shutting, so gently I muscled it back to a closing position, by then the gig is winding down and I'm still looking at my horn and cussing trying not to bend my octave lever too much, at the end of the show the horn came back a bit.

Now I'm home and goin..back to the shop ??


BTW fun gig this morning, outdoor Patio was 38 degrees when we started at 9am..even so we had a great crowd and it's reached 52 by noon.
 
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