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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi I'm new on saxontheweb. I have done a bit of searching, though i'm in a bit of a time crunch. I need to find out what the basic differences are in jazz and classical mouthpieces.

So far what I've understood (I think!) is that classical pieces give a darker sound, (less overtones) and jazz pieces are generally brighter and have more overtones. What is it about the mpc, (chamber, facing, and maybe tip opening??) that makes the main differences?

Thanks much,

dburris
 

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The two most influential aspects are:

Smaller the chamber = brighter the sound
Thicker baffle = brighter sound (This is also called a "high" baffle, which seems counterintuitive to me, but nonetheless...!)

Most classical mouthpieces will have at least a medium-sized chamber, most will have a large chamber.
 

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So far what I've understood (I think!) is that classical pieces give a darker sound, (less overtones) and jazz pieces are generally brighter and have more overtones. What is it about the mpc, (chamber, facing, and maybe tip opening??) that makes the main differences?
The player (embouchure, the way he/she blows, his/her sound concept). Everything else is secondary.
 

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The tip opening on a classical mp tends to be smaller than on a jazz mp. Think of the massive tip on a Dukoff, compared with the really narrow one on an old Buescher piece, for example. This is part of the reason why classical mouthpieces can handle harder reeds than jazz pieces.
 

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The tip opening on a classical mp tends to be smaller than on a jazz mp. Think of the massive tip on a Dukoff, compared with the really narrow one on an old Buescher piece, for example. This is part of the reason why classical mouthpieces can handle harder reeds than jazz pieces.
that's not that linear but it's more or less true ya
 

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Although I had a teacher who played mostly classical and pit for shows with a nice classical sound, and he used a Jumbo Java...
 

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I use a Rousseau 4R for jazz on a Martin. Uh oh...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The two most influential aspects are:

Smaller the chamber = brighter the sound
Thicker baffle = brighter sound (This is also called a "high" baffle, which seems counterintuitive to me, but nonetheless...!)

Most classical mouthpieces will have at least a medium-sized chamber, most will have a large chamber.
Thanks, this is what I have been learning. Much appreciated!
 

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The player (embouchure, the way he/she blows, his/her sound concept). Everything else is secondary.
+5

I have used my classical setup (Morgan 6C) for big band performances and my jazz setup (Vandoren V16 0.122") for classical quartet.

The player dominates the mouthpiece. If it's the other way 'round, the player needs to head for the shed.

Mouthpiece classifications are just an arbitrary starting point. You need to define your concept and find the gear that helps you achieve it.
 

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I actually prefer a dark sound with lots of overtones... try finding that combo in a mouthpiece.
 

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I actually prefer a dark sound with lots of overtones... try finding that combo in a mouthpiece.
Have you tried the Morgan "C" series?
 

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I agree with you conceptually, but man I hated playing those C**'s in college..... I actually ended up being able to sneak my ottolink in on all my classical requirement's, and if they didnt look, they wouldn't notice ;)
 
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