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Discussion Starter #1
WEEK 2

SOUND

  • Update:
My embouchure is much more stable, and i'm now realizing that LONG TONES and OVERTONES are essential for my pratice routine.
  • Question:
I don't like how some notes sound, like C# without the octave key. Any ideas for exercises working just "one note"?

TUNES

  • Update:
I've been working on some tunes like "All The things you are" or "Nica's Dream", and one of the exercises that really help to learn the structure of this tunes are "chromatic approximations". What is this?
We have like F-7 and Bb-7 (first two chords of All the things you are) and with the metronome at 60bpm, I do the triads of each chord. F-Ab-C/F-Bb-Db (I hope you understand)

  • Question:
How can I develop my ideas? Yes I have some idea of theory and the harmony on my head, how can I come with that lick ideas, or how can I improve mentally to play better?


TRANSCRIPTIONS

  • Update:
Working on "Remember" of Hank Mobley. Learned all the tune and the solos. Trying to go to the main "artists" of "early" jazz and advance from now on.

  • Question:
Working all the solo is good? Should I transcribe more solos to develop my ideas? How can I know what is "good" to transcribe and what is "not"?
Thanks for all the support on this post, you're GREAT!Cool
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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WEEK 2

SOUND

  • Update:
My embouchure is much more stable, and i'm now realizing that LONG TONES and OVERTONES are essential for my pratice routine.
  • Question:
I don't like how some notes sound, like C# without the octave key. Any ideas for exercises working just "one note"?
You say "Classical to Jazz", but this seems fundamental to all music. To better help you, please let us know your background, your level of experience.
 

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  • Question:
Working all the solo is good? Should I transcribe more solos to develop my ideas? How can I know what is "good" to transcribe and what is "not"?
Thanks for all the support on this post, you're GREAT!Cool
If you like it, it's good, if you don't, it's not. :mrgreen:

We all have our own aesthetic, so figuring out which players move us and spending a lot of time listening to them is a big part of eventually developing our own styles.

Literally anything you learn from a recording is going to help develop your ear, however sticking to common forms (blues, 32 bar AABA, i.e. standards) is probably more immediately useful, as it gives you vocabulary you can adapt and actually play at a jam session, assuming you are playing standards.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You say "Classical to Jazz", but this seems fundamental to all music. To better help you, please let us know your background, your level of experience.
Sorry!

My background:

I'm from Portugal, I'm 24 years old and I play saxophone since i'm 9 years old.

I graduated at ESML (Escola Superior de Música de Lisboa) on Classical Saxophone, and i'm currently finishing my master degree on music teaching (saxophone).

My interest on Jazz was always big, and now I finally had the courage to start learning this new language.

What pratice routine are you doing? :)
 

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I'm kind of backwards to what you're doing. I'm more of a jazz player and I've been working on a couple of challenging classical pieces on alto and I'm LOVING it! I always avoided classical on saxophone- flute was fine but it seemed heretical or something for saxophone. Plus, I was afraid the MP I would have to use would be stuffy and weird- it's not at all, and my sound has really improved. It's opened a whole new world for me and I've been practicing a lot more. I think I just needed a new challenge or something. :)
 

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WEEK 2

SOUND

  • Update:
My embouchure is much more stable, and i'm now realizing that LONG TONES and OVERTONES are essential for my pratice routine.
  • Question:
I don't like how some notes sound, like C# without the octave key. Any ideas for exercises working just "one note"?
Well, you can do overtone matching: play first overtone of low C#, then switch to open C# and work on matching the tone. Also, opening side C along during C3 it helps the pitch and the tone (imo).

Also, I would recommend you add just...improvisation for fun to your practice routine. Throw on a iRealBook blues or even just a 1 chord vamp and experiment. Too much rigor can cause one to forget the spontaneity and fun (does for me).
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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WEEK 2

I don't like how some notes sound, like C# without the octave key. Any ideas for exercises working just "one note"?
No need to work just one note. That one note is always a bit awrkward so working long notes generally, and listening to that one in context of what's either side is the best way to even out the sound.

Long notes on their own aren't enough, I'd suggest learning tone control exercises with long notes. e.g.: https://tamingthesaxophone.com/saxophone-tone-exercises

As others have said, any transcribing of great players will be useful. I'd suggest transcribe small bits of many players rather than getting bogged down with just one - learn many different styles and approaches, that way you will find the one that suits you. We are all different and although there are some basic "rules" there is more often a lot of your own personal individuality involved in learning a jazz style.
 

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I don't understand why this people flame so much eheh! Music is about feelings ahah!
Maybe it's because everyone wants to know what happened in Week 1?

Seriously, your post is a bit confusing: you're on "Week 2" of your studies, but you've already advanced far enough that you can play the tune and solos of Hank Mobley's "Remember"? That's good! And yet you're having problems getting a decent tone on C#? It seems like you would've already worked that out on your way to getting your degree in classical saxophone, but OK.

I would assume, given your background, that your technique is already pretty well developed and you just need to "learn the jazz language." I would continue doing transcriptions of players you like, and spend a lot of time just improvising, trying to copy them.
 

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Sorry!

My background:

I'm from Portugal, I'm 24 years old and I play saxophone since i'm 9 years old.

I graduated at ESML (Escola Superior de Música de Lisboa) on Classical Saxophone, and i'm currently finishing my master degree on music teaching (saxophone).

My interest on Jazz was always big, and now I finally had the courage to start learning this new language.

What pratice routine are you doing? :)
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?323705-The-Greatest-Albums&p=3520641#post3520641

Pedro, if you are studying with Bob Reynolds, listen to his advice and put it to work. Don't dilute his lessons with the random stuff that you will gather here.

At best, here you will get each person's take on what is best for them, but without hearing you in person, any advice is only a guess.

I find it very difficult to believe that you don't already have solid fundamentals that lend themselves to playing jazz. Check out the many threads on book suggestions, lessons, sound production, etc.

For one-stop shopping, there is a lot of advice available from Tim Price (who also teaches via Skype): http://www.saxontheweb.net/Price/
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Maybe it's because everyone wants to know what happened in Week 1?

Seriously, your post is a bit confusing: you're on "Week 2" of your studies, but you've already advanced far enough that you can play the tune and solos of Hank Mobley's "Remember"? That's good! And yet you're having problems getting a decent tone on C#? It seems like you would've already worked that out on your way to getting your degree in classical saxophone, but OK.

I would assume, given your background, that your technique is already pretty well developed and you just need to "learn the jazz language." I would continue doing transcriptions of players you like, and spend a lot of time just improvising, trying to copy them.

Hey MLucky,

Thanks for your response,

"And yet you're having problems getting a decent tone on C#?" about that, Classical Saxophone is a bit different, I have a sound with vibrato and in the jazz language I "cannot" or don't want to use so much "vibrato". My C# is a bit tiny, and I want to expand my sound and get a even sound in all register. In Classical I mostly play alto, and now I'm switching for tenor!

About Week 1 - Sorry, was my bad and I forgot about putting here my "wordpad" :)
 

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https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?323705-The-Greatest-Albums&p=3520641#post3520641

Pedro, if you are studying with Bob Reynolds, listen to his advice and put it to work. Don't dilute his lessons with the random stuff that you will gather here.

At best, here you will get each person's take on what is best for them, but without hearing you in person, any advice is only a guess.

I find it very difficult to believe that you don't already have solid fundamentals that lend themselves to playing jazz. Check out the many threads on book suggestions, lessons, sound production, etc.

For one-stop shopping, there is a lot of advice available from Tim Price (who also teaches via Skype): http://www.saxontheweb.net/Price/

You're a GOD! Thank you :D!
 

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Thank you :D!
You’re welcome, Pedro.

Some advice I will share, tho’, given that you mentioned transitioning to tenor sax, is embracing the concept of blowing THROUGH the horn, rather than into it. Many alto players coming to tenor continue to sound like an alto, rather than giving it sufficient air support to develop a full sound.

Best wishes for your endeavor.
 

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You’re welcome, Pedro.

Some advice I will share, tho’, given that you mentioned transitioning to tenor sax, is embracing the concept of blowing THROUGH the horn, rather than into it. Many alto players coming to tenor continue to sound like an alto, rather than giving it sufficient air support to develop a full sound.

Best wishes for your endeavor.
I think transcribing is one of the best exercises when you change instrument, I've been transcribing the Remember solo of Hank Mobley, and I felt that my sound and air support were way fuller than I was "praticing" improvising without a "reference"
 

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I think transcribing is one of the best exercises when you change instrument, I've been transcribing the Remember solo of Hank Mobley, and I felt that my sound and air support were way fuller than I was "praticing" improvising without a "reference"
It is a great idea to immerse yourself in the music that you want to emulate. I have a substantial a collection of Stanley Turrentine, and there have been some months in past years when I would listen only to Turrentine every day.
 

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It is a great idea to immerse yourself in the music that you want to emulate. I have a substantial a collection of Stanley Turrentine, and there have been some months in past years when I would listen only to Turrentine every day.
I'm currently transcribing a lick of Sonny Stitt "I'll Remember April".

I have a question, transcribing alto sax solos on tenor is wrong? Or is good, or doesn't matter if is alto or tenor as long as I like?
 

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I'm currently transcribing a lick of Sonny Stitt "I'll Remember April".

I have a question, transcribing alto sax solos on tenor is wrong? Or is good, or doesn't matter if is alto or tenor as long as I like?
You need to weigh the benefits to determine what is right for you.
 

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WEEK 2

SOUND

  • Update:
My embouchure is much more stable, and i'm now realizing that LONG TONES and OVERTONES are essential for my pratice routine.
  • Question:
I don't like how some notes sound, like C# without the octave key. Any ideas for exercises working just "one note"?

TUNES

  • Update:
I've been working on some tunes like "All The things you are" or "Nica's Dream", and one of the exercises that really help to learn the structure of this tunes are "chromatic approximations". What is this?
We have like F-7 and Bb-7 (first two chords of All the things you are) and with the metronome at 60bpm, I do the triads of each chord. F-Ab-C/F-Bb-Db (I hope you understand)

  • Question:
How can I develop my ideas? Yes I have some idea of theory and the harmony on my head, how can I come with that lick ideas, or how can I improve mentally to play better?


TRANSCRIPTIONS

  • Update:
Working on "Remember" of Hank Mobley. Learned all the tune and the solos. Trying to go to the main "artists" of "early" jazz and advance from now on.

  • Question:
Working all the solo is good? Should I transcribe more solos to develop my ideas? How can I know what is "good" to transcribe and what is "not"?
Thanks for all the support on this post, you're GREAT!Cool
I just thought I'd mention this as I don't see it in your list of practice items. How much time a day are you spending improvising.

http://www.neffmusic.com/blog/2015/09/the-1-thing-you-need-to-do-to-become-a-great-improviser/

I have had a ton of students who studied classical sax and now want to learn jazz improvisation. All of them are great at analytical lists of things to do that involve transcribing, chord and scale exercises, learning licks..........One thing they all have in common is that they don't spend much time if any improvising. This might not be you, but in my mind you should be spending a large % of your time practicing improvising and learning how to get your brain working that way. If you can't come up with things to play that is a sign that you need to keep doing it more and more.........
 

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On some general goals you might benefit from reading Jerry Coker's How to Practice Jazz. https://www.amazon.com/How-Practice-Jazz-Jerry-Coker/dp/1562240013

I personally benefitted from Jamey Aebersold's Play-Alongs Vol. 1, 2, and 54.

Then Shelton Berg's The Goal Note Method. https://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Improvisation-Goal-Note-Method/dp/B004KU3WDI

Jerry Cokers Pattern for Jazz is classic. https://www.amazon.com/Patterns-Jazz-Theory-Composition-Improvisation/dp/0769230172

Transcribe, listen voraciously not only to recordings but to live music.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
On some general goals you might benefit from reading Jerry Coker's How to Practice Jazz. https://www.amazon.com/How-Practice-Jazz-Jerry-Coker/dp/1562240013

I personally benefitted from Jamey Aebersold's Play-Alongs Vol. 1, 2, and 54.

Then Shelton Berg's The Goal Note Method. https://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Improvisation-Goal-Note-Method/dp/B004KU3WDI

Jerry Cokers Pattern for Jazz is classic. https://www.amazon.com/Patterns-Jazz-Theory-Composition-Improvisation/dp/0769230172

Transcribe, listen voraciously not only to recordings but to live music.
Good Stuff here, I didn't know that Jerry Bergonzi was the recommended teacher from Michael Brecker, I didn't even know Coltrane praticed 11 hours on ONE SCALE, this is madness, is like a Spartan Workout for Musicians, good stuff here Gary, thank you :)
 
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