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There is no such thing as classical saxophone.
 

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I'm confused why you are contrasting "lower lip as cushion" with "rolling in". I take it the former refers to the Teal embouchure? If so, he certainly advocates rolling the lower lip in also. What I think I see different about Rascher's approach is that he doesn't pull the corners in, which seems to keep his lower lip flatter and less cushiony, I suppose.

There are many different approaches, prominently in addition to Teal, Allard. You can search the site for more info. There isn't one correct approach, you have to find out what works for you.
 

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I'm confused why you are contrasting "lower lip as cushion" with "rolling in". I take it the former refers to the Teal embouchure? If so, he certainly advocates rolling the lower lip in also. What I think I see different about Rascher's approach is that he doesn't pull the corners in, which seems to keep his lower lip flatter and less cushiony, I suppose.
This is pretty spot on. The lower lip is kept taught by pulling the chin muscles down and pulling the corners back so the lower lip acts as a firm, flat pad, not so much a cushion. The idea is the lip shouldn't be dampening the reed so it is free to vibrate as much as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I tried the Rascher way, and (minus the fact that I wasn't used to it) it just didn't work as well as the embouchure I was using before...it isn't THAT much different, but I'll just stick with my current embouchure.
 

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Although there isn't really a set embouchure for saxophone playing (not like the flute or clarinet, or double reeds, or brass instruments that have been around much longer than the saxophone), there are some suggestions to a classical saxophone embouchure. It is much firmer than a jazz embouchure. In my experience, I attempt to avoid using lip pressure on the top or bottom (your upper lip should not be doing ANYTHING really, but form a seal to keep air in), but do keep the sides/corners firm. Your embouchure should allow the reed to vibrate as it needs to, from low Bb to high F#, and all the way up to altissimo F/G, and the tone should be even across the board (even when going from open to closed notes and vice versa.) A decent amount of work is done with voicing/throat positions aka shaping your oral cavity as if you were singing the note in order to control intonation/tone/timbre/altissimo. You should not have to work too hard if your horn has leaks, so please support your local repair technician if he or she does a good job by taking in your horn!

Just my experience so far.
 

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I'm confused why you are contrasting "lower lip as cushion" with "rolling in". I take it the former refers to the Teal embouchure? If so, he certainly advocates rolling the lower lip in also. What I think I see different about Rascher's approach is that he doesn't pull the corners in, which seems to keep his lower lip flatter and less cushiony, I suppose.

There are many different approaches, prominently in addition to Teal, Allard. You can search the site for more info. There isn't one correct approach, you have to find out what works for you.
When I hear "roll out", I imagine pouting. Pushing your lips out from you as in an exaggerating kissing motion. Making "duck" lips.

When I hear "roll in", I imaging rolling the entire lip,not just part of it, over the teeth so that even the red part of the lip is inside the mouth. It's what you would do with your lips if you were trying to impersonate an elderly person who'd lost all their teeth.

These are extreme examples.

As a jazz player, when I create a cushion, my lip is pointed more or less straight up. The very middle of my lip (roughly where my upper teeth would contact the lip when saying the letter "V") is what makes contact with the reed. Some of my lip naturally folds in a little and some of it naturally folds out. From that "neutral" position, if I were to "lip out" then more of the inside part of my lip would be in contact with the reed. And if I were to "lip in" then more of the outside part of my lip would be in contact with the reed.

To me, "rolling in" creates a noticeably firmer cushion than what I get from a neutral position where I'm trying to get the softest cushion possible.

From watching the video, Rascher does appear to roll in more than I normally would.
 
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