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I am essentially a Jazz saxophonist but for one of my upcoming auditions I am expected to also play a classical song...My question is, Are there anything that is done in music that is considered "jazz only?" For instance, can I still use vibrato??
 

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No, you are expected to play like a clarinet! hehe, all kidding aside, vibrato in classical sax is done with more refinement and taste. The best advice I can give you is to listen to some classical sax players just like you probably listen to jazz saxophonists. By the way songs are sung words. Piece or work would best suit the music you are talking about here.
 

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Right on, Rick.

I find it interesting that you ask, "can I still use vibrato?" because I think of vibrato as such a necessary classical technique and more of an accessory to a lot of my jazz playing. It really depends on what era you're playing ... swing or older uses it a lot ... ballads, modern jazz. But most other styles I try to eliminate it.

You'll have to tend to the obvious -- put more emphasis on reading articulations and avoid any swing feel or tonguing off the beat. Your strong beats are now 1 and 3. Play what's written on the page ;-)

FWIW, if you don't want to try changing your setup to sound more classical, it's not unheard of to play Piazzolla Tango Etudes using a jazz mouthpiece. Excellent pieces, lots of fun, and of course unaccompanied so it would save you some accompanist cash, but I don't know the circumstances of your audition.
 

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thejoyofsax said:
Right on, Rick.

I find it interesting that you ask, "can I still use vibrato?" because I think of vibrato as such a necessary classical technique and more of an accessory to a lot of my jazz playing. It really depends on what era you're playing ... swing or older uses it a lot ... ballads, modern jazz. But most other styles I try to eliminate it.

You'll have to tend to the obvious -- put more emphasis on reading articulations and avoid any swing feel or tonguing off the beat. Your strong beats are now 1 and 3. Play what's written on the page ;-)

FWIW, if you don't want to try changing your setup to sound more classical, it's not unheard of to play Piazzolla Tango Etudes using a jazz mouthpiece. Excellent pieces, lots of fun, and of course unaccompanied so it would save you some accompanist cash, but I don't know the circumstances of your audition.

Blue Caprice would work with a jazz piece too, and is unaccompanied.
 

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And I'll throw in the Phil Woods Sonata...

Rick's advice is extremely sound, BTW. You need to hear a few classical saxophonists. A good place to start would be the Eugene Rousseau Concerto album or the "Le Saxophone Francais" collection, which has recordings by Jean-Marie Londeix, Daniel Deffayet, and Marcel Mule.
 

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I'll second J.Max's recommendation of the Rousseau "Concertos" disc, which can be found quite cheaply.

Though there's a wide variety of repertoire recorded on that Le Saxophone Francaise boxset, I find that it serves better as a historical reference than a current model of concert saxophone playing. The Mule (and Deffayet to a slightly lesser extent) stuff on those CDs is very dated, and Londeix himself has recommended avoiding his older recordings as an example.

Instead, I would highly recommend Arno Bornkamp's cheap double disc "The Classical Saxophone" as well as Nobuya Sugawa's rather expensive boxset "Exhibition of Saxophone". If you get these, you get probably the most standard concerto/recital/transcription repertoire for less than $100 as is possible.

Remember that quality listening is equally as important as smart physical practice. It's less an oral tradition as it is an aural tradition.

Angel
 

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Angel said:
I'll second J.Max's recommendation of the Rousseau "Concertos" disc, which can be found quite cheaply.

Though there's a wide variety of repertoire recorded on that Le Saxophone Francaise boxset, I find that it serves better as a historical reference than a current model of concert saxophone playing. The Mule (and Deffayet to a slightly lesser extent) stuff on those CDs is very dated, and Londeix himself has recommended avoiding his older recordings as an example.

Instead, I would highly recommend Arno Bornkamp's cheap double disc "The Classical Saxophone" as well as Nobuya Sugawa's rather expensive boxset "Exhibition of Saxophone". If you get these, you get probably the most standard concerto/recital/transcription repertoire for less than $100 as is possible.

Remember that quality listening is equally as important as smart physical practice. It's less an oral tradition as it is an aural tradition.

Angel

I completely forgot about the Bornkamp set. I'll second that one.

And the "Le Saxophone Francais" set is dated, but I was trying to think of something with a lot of repertoire on it...the Bornkamp set is better though.
 

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Vibrato big yes.
I use it more in classical than I do in jazz.
For classical, I don't play accents from the diaphragm (does that make sense?).
Unlike in jazz, every accent/staccato is not as much emphasized in my opinon. (but don't forget to put them in and make them noticable!)
 
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