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Hi Guys,

I'm looking for a book that has the classic sax solos - there seem to be plenty that have arrangements for saxes eg I can find books that include Baker Street where the whole song is arranged for sax but I'm after a book that has is arranged maybe for piano, guitar etc but with the classic sax solo bits for sax. Does anyone have any suggestions please?

Thanks.
 

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I've never seen one and I can't imagine there being one. There's quite a bit of popular music for the sax, but it comes under the general heading of Band & Orchestra, (to be used as an adjunct to regular sax /band method books), and involves songs du jour of a given period, (Hits of the 90's), or a particular movie, (Alladin), etc., with the vocal line arranged for sax. The closest you'd come would be one of several Rock methods that uses excerpts of tunes as examples of particular musical devices. There are tons of pop anthologies for guitar, but then again, there are tons more guitarists than sax players............daryl
 

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Forget the book. Get some cds. It's all on there for you.
 

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The stuff just doesn't exist

Just like most instrumental solos, the music is never written down and published. The soloists have already done the solo many times and know what they like. They then record that solo trying to get the best peformance possible, and leave it at that. Except for very rare circumstances, they are not playing off of a written down solo. Then, the music is published out. No one takes the time to transcribe it, so it is never done. I had to do a transcription of Paul Desmond on "Things Ain't What They Used To Be" and for all I know (since I did a quick google search) I may be the first person to ever transcribe the head and first 24 bars of the solo. It just doesn't happen often in jazz or rock or any genre that the solo is written down. How often do you even see guitar or piano solos written down? The majority of the time, you don't.
 

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I think that is entirely true and for good reason, when you are reading a piece from a sheet you are devoting a significant amount of resources to the process of playing what is written. While it is certainly possible to read and while playing the piece from the sheet to take off on a solo and come back to the sheet, it is FAR more effective to my thinking when you know the piece by heart in several keys and can solo from your heart and mind. While I am someone who enjoys having the sheet, and playing from a sheet is easier, I think we come closest to the true lifeblood of music when we are playing without anything in front of us but our ears, mind, heart, soul and are intent on listening to the sound being produced and our focus is completely relegated to the production of that sound, the shaping of the sound, the blending of the sound to those who are playing with us rather than being subject to a sheet.

Lest anyone should bring up a previous post asking for the sheet to "Yardbird Suite" and say I am being hypocritical I admit there are times when I , like most of us can be lazy. When it is easier and more gratifying in the short term to be able to play the tune we want in the shortest amount of time. Rather than taking the far more enriching and rewarding path of figuring things out with our ears and mind, making the mistakes, taking the time, and receiving much greater growth and internalization in the process. May the LORD give me the strength and courage to strive for the latter for all of my days, because in my mind those folks are the true players. Jay
 

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ehrgie said:
I think that is entirely true and for good reason, when you are reading a piece from a sheet you are devoting a significant amount of resources to the process of playing what is written. While it is certainly possible to read and while playing the piece from the sheet to take off on a solo and come back to the sheet, it is FAR more effective to my thinking when you know the piece by heart in several keys and can solo from your heart and mind. While I am someone who enjoys having the sheet, and playing from a sheet is easier, I think we come closest to the true lifeblood of music when we are playing without anything in front of us but our ears, mind, heart, soul and are intent on listening to the sound being produced and our focus is completely relegated to the production of that sound, the shaping of the sound, the blending of the sound to those who are playing with us rather than being subject to a sheet.

Lest anyone should bring up a previous post asking for the sheet to "Yardbird Suite" and say I am being hypocritical I admit there are times when I , like most of us can be lazy. When it is easier and more gratifying in the short term to be able to play the tune we want in the shortest amount of time. Rather than taking the far more enriching and rewarding path of figuring things out with our ears and mind, making the mistakes, taking the time, and receiving much greater growth and internalization in the process. May the LORD give me the strength and courage to strive for the latter for all of my days, because in my mind those folks are the true players. Jay
You gotta do both.
 

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Hi SlugP:
In case you haven't seen them already, SOTW's "Blues, R&B, and Rock n' Roll Teaching Resource" has transcripts for some of the better known solos.
http://www.saxontheweb.net/Rock_n_Roll/RockSax14.html

For specific solos, check with Curtis Swift www.saxsolos.com. He's very good and very reasonable. Tune transposing and music notation services also are available.
 

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Actually there are quite a few transcriptions of jazz solos (the famous Charlie Parker Omnibook comes to mind). And as Neil points out, there are some transcripts of blues/R&B, etc. Curtis Swift does a great job!

These things are great to use as "etude practice," and to some extent for ideas to use in your own solos. But keep in mind, the original solo was not played off a sheet of music. There may be some exceptions to this, but they'd be very rare. In many, probably most, cases, the original soloist probably couldn't even play it all that well by reading the transcription!

There's a classic anecdote I read somewhere about Dizzy Gillespie. Someone presented him with a transcription of one of his great solos. After looking at it, Dizzy said "I can't play that!" Who knows if this is a true story, but it illustrates the point. The written notes are not the whole story.
 

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JL said:
Actually there are quite a few transcriptions of jazz solos (the famous Charlie Parker Omnibook comes to mind). And as Neil points out, there are some transcripts of blues/R&B, etc. Curtis Swift does a great job!

These things are great to use as "etude practice," and to some extent for ideas to use in your own solos. But keep in mind, the original solo was not played off a sheet of music. There may be some exceptions to this, but they'd be very rare. In many, probably most, cases, the original soloist probably couldn't even play it all that well by reading the transcription!

There's a classic anecdote I read somewhere about Dizzy Gillespie. Someone presented him with a transcription of one of his great solos. After looking at it, Dizzy said "I can't play that!" Who knows if this is a true story, but it illustrates the point. The written notes are not the whole story.
I don't know about Dizzy, but I know it happened with Coltrane. Here's an excerpt from the book, "Chasin the Trane", by J.C. Thomas:
"Classical pianist Zito Carno transcribed John Coltrane's eight chorus solo, note for note, from the recorded version of his own composition, "Blue Train". When she met the saxophonist in person, she asked him to play the same solo again, reading from her transciption. He replied, "I can't; it's too difficult."
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks

Hi Guys,

Thanks for the replies. I've been looking for a while thinking that there must be something out there so your comments have been very helpful.

Thanks.
 
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