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I just watched the Netflix Original "Keep On Keepin' On". It follows Clark and a handful of his students as he hits 92 years old. A little sad, often funny, and very enjoyable. Cameos by Quicy Jones and many more. Anyone else check it out?
 

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I have. It was very touching. I had seen many youtube clips of him before. He was the guy who could explain "Jazz articulation" in a very simple way (doodle). It immediately made sense. Nothing like the things you find in books.
My articulation is inspired by him, whenever I attempt to play some kind of jazzy thing.
 

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I just watched the Netflix Original "Keep On Keepin' On". It follows Clark and a handful of his students as he hits 92 years old. A little sad, often funny, and very enjoyable. Cameos by Quicy Jones and many more. Anyone else check it out?
Might check it out tonight actually.


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Yes indeed. Clark was one of the greatest. Always an inspiration. A must see for all jazzers.
 

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loved it

I took care of many adults with diabetes and poor circulation to the feet... just terrible. I really felt bad for the great artist.
 

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One of my fondest memories of Clark Terry was several years ago at a jazz concert in a small outdoor venue in Salt Lake City. After the concert started, it began to rain---not a drizzle, but a steady downpour. The stage of course was covered, but the audience seating was not, and many folks got up and started to leave. Clark stopped the band in the middle of a tune and said to those of us still left, "There's no use you folks getting wet out there, come on up on the stage with us". Many of us went up on stage and sat in a circle around the band right next to the musicians and listened for the next hour or so. What a thrill to hear such great players up close and personal. Clark seemed to be having a ball interacting with the fans. His joy of playing and of the music itself was contagious. I have a smile on my face writing this and reminiscing.
 

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One of my fondest memories of Clark Terry was several years ago at a jazz concert in a small outdoor venue in Salt Lake City. After the concert started, it began to rain---not a drizzle, but a steady downpour. The stage of course was covered, but the audience seating was not, and many folks got up and started to leave. Clark stopped the band in the middle of a tune and said to those of us still left, "There's no use you folks getting wet out there, come on up on the stage with us". Many of us went up on stage and sat in a circle around the band right next to the musicians and listened for the next hour or so. What a thrill to hear such great players up close and personal. Clark seemed to be having a ball interacting with the fans. His joy of playing and of the music itself was contagious. I have a smile on my face writing this and reminiscing.
What a sweet memory saxoclese! I remember when I went to his "Great Plains" jazz camp in high school (I'm from Kansas)- at a school literally in the middle of nowhere. I haven't had the chance to see the documentary but I'll try and find it.
 

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I had the opportunity to attend a master class held by Clark Terry in Philadelphia many years ago. I learned a great many things that day...and mostly about my attitude towards jazz and music in general. It was eye opening on a number of levels and I thoroughly enjoyed getting to meet him.

- Saxaholic
 
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