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Discussion Starter #1
What are some stereotypes about clarinets you hear about, or maybe discuss ones mentioned here? Such as:

-Wood is the best.
-Synthetic reeds are terrible.
-He/She plays a Buffet, she must be good. Or: His/Her clarinet is a Buffet, it's a good one.*
-Vintage horns are horrible/New horns are horrible.
-Vandoren is the best type of reed, Rico is the worst.
-No one makes better mouthpieces than such and such.
-Clarinet is the easiest instrument.
-Clarinet players NEVER practice.

*Not bashing Buffet, I just hear this a lot.

Those are just a few I've heard.
 

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-Wood is the best.
Yes, it is. I've played on plastic clarinets and oboes. They are good, but still aren't as good as the wood ones.

-Synthetic reeds are terrible.
Um, I don't like them, but I know a number of people who play on them and sound great.

-He/She plays a Buffet, she must be good. Or: His/Her clarinet is a Buffet, it's a good one.
Never heard this. Buffet makes crap clarinets too. I've played dogs that are R13s, and I've played some E11s and older Evette ones that play great.

-Vintage horns are horrible/New horns are horrible.
Never heard this. Each instrument is different.

-Vandoren is the best type of reed, Rico is the worst.
Aren't they all owned by the same company now? I dunno, I just use Vandoren V12s 4 strength. I just never bother to try anything else since I like the Vandorens.

-No one makes better mouthpieces than such and such.
There are a number of great mouthpiece makers so......I'd say this is BS

-Clarinet is the easiest instrument.
It's not as hard as say Oboe, but certainly isn't as easy as saxophone.

-Clarinet players NEVER practice.
Not true. Clarinet practicing is essential.
 

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"My two-year old clarinet is blown out."
 

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I've never heard anyone claim that clarinet is the easiest instrument.

I do agree about Buffets, though. I think the stereotype is that Buffets are the best clarinet, with no arguments. Though I've never played one, I'm sure they're good, although plenty of other brands are good, too. And even if they are "the best," not everyone needs to spend Buffet money to sound good.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
*Also I'm not the one who says/believes these statements, I'm just posting what I have heard others say.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I do agree about Buffets, though. I think the stereotype is that Buffets are the best clarinet, with no arguments. Though I've never played one, I'm sure they're good, although plenty of other brands are good, too. And even if they are "the best," not everyone needs to spend Buffet money to sound good.
A story from my private lessons teacher. His Buffet C clarinet got stolen, and he decided to try a Lyrique and see if it was worth purchasing as a replacement. When he got it he was amazed at the fact that the Lyrique played a lot better than the Buffet ever did. He said that on that day he realized when he bought the Buffet long ago, he paid for their name stamped on it.
 

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Yes, it is. I've played on plastic clarinets and oboes. They are good, but still aren't as good as the wood ones.
I've never seen any reasons why that would be acoustically valid. I wonder if non-wood instruments are just considered to be "student-to-intermediate" level and less craftsmanship is applied to their design and construction"? I've heard of (but haven't heard) high quality metal Selmers from the 20's which were pretty sumptuous in tone. My composite Greenline Buffet is every bit as resonant and "woody" sounding as my Series 10 Selmer. The tone of my plastic bass draws favorable comments from seasoned reedmen.
 

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I have heard that the old hard rubber clarinets are great.
 

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All girls that play the clarinet are unattractive and quiet.
Well, I'm not completely unattractive, and definately NOT quiet.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
All girls that play the clarinet are unattractive and quiet.
I've always found that quite the opposite.

Heres another:

All metal clarinets are terrible. (My band directors...)
 

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"Clarinetists never practice". Wow! If I don't practice mine every day, it feels awful.
 

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All girls that play the clarinet are unattractive and quiet.
Well, I'm not completely unattractive, and definately NOT quiet.
I hear you! Clarinetists are nerds and mild mannered is what I've been assigned. I can be both but can also be quite the opposite.

One other that sticks out is, "you should oil your wood clarinet once in a while".
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Heres another:

The only good bass is one with a double register mechanism.

I've just recently discovered this is NOT true.:mrgreen:
 

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Heres another:

All metal clarinets are terrible. (My band directors...)
They're going on their own directors' advice. None of them, probably, have ever tried a metal Selmer, Conn, Buescher, King, Penzel-Mueller or Bettoney from the 20s-30s era.

I've had great results with the first 3 and heard good things about the last 3. All were considered pro models in their day, too - unimaginable a few decades later, which is about how far back the collective memory goes.
 

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Do you know someone who'd consider a Model T fit for today's roads? Yet it was what the nation brought forward, so to speak.
And yes, I have it on good authority that the majority couldn't tell a metal from a wooden clarinet, by just listening to some music...
 

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Do you know someone who'd consider a Model T fit for today's roads?
They're damn nice to spin around in now and again. Besides, the clarinet equivalent to the T would probably be made of boxwood, and have open holes and only about three keys.

You might think of the pro metal horns as Corvairs - not your very best ride (I have Selmer B-Ts for that), but underrated for what they are.
 
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