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Distinguished SOTW Technician
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You can adjust the tension.
You'll need to remove the key - this is easy enough, just unscrew the rod screw and pull it out (place your thumb over the centre of the key as you withdraw the screw, to counter the force of the spring pushing the key up...also stops the key flying off).

Once the key is off you'll see that there's a long flat spring fitted to the underside which will be curved upwards (as you hold the key upside down). What you need to do is bend this spring so that its tip rests at a lower height than it is now.
Take a pair of small pliers - smooth jawed for preference - and carefully grip the spring about a third of the way along its length from the mounting screw.
Grip the key over the mounting screw so that your thumb is pressing the first quarter of the spring down against the key - this helps to relieve the stress on the screw when you bend the spring.

Twist the pliers gently to bend the end of the spring down slightly, release the jaws and move them up the spring towards the tip a little and repeat. This is reduce the curvature of the spring over most of its length and make it weaker.
Test it by refitting it to the instrument - no need to screw the screw right in, just poke it in until the thread catches on the pillar...it will be enough to hold it in place while you check the feel of the spring tension.
Repeat the process as necessary.

If it doesn't back the tension off enough, grip the spring about a third of the way from the tip and give it a more forceful turn down.
Once you've got it how you want it, check that the spring screw is still secure - then refit the key. Don't forget to oil the rod screw - and a tiny, tiny drop of oil on the tip of the spring will help too.

If you don't have any pliers to hand you can bend the spring by hand. With the key held upside down, push the spring away from you. It should move quite easily, and in so doing will loosen the spring retaining screw. You will now be able to grip the spring along its entire length with your fingers. Again, keep your thumb over the mounting screw to support it, then gently bend the spring with your fingers in the same fashion as with the pliers. Check the tension with the key on the instrument, and once satisfied give the spring retaining screw a turn to retighten it.

Regards,
 

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Distinguished SOTW Technician
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2,547 Posts
...and if you overdo it and make the spring too weak, making it stronger means you have to bend it back up.
As it's a new instrument the spring should be in good condition and will tolerate a bit of bending - but not too much...

Regards,
 

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Distinguished SOTW Technician
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You have two choices, essentially. Use a decent branded product - such as http://www.doctorsprod.com/store/comersus_listItems.asp?idCategory=15 - or just use a natural oil.

I favour walnut oil - makes a nice salad dressing too, but groundnut oil does just as well, as does sweet almond oil Avoid lemon oil, and steer clear of synthetic/mineral oils or any branded oil that doesn't tell you exactly what's in it.

Regards,
 

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Distinguished SOTW Technician
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All natural oils go rancid and smell bad. Maybe putting new oil over old will wash out the old, I don't know. I just don't like the smell of rancid oil. Does anyone use mineral oil?
Oh dear - what d'you think your clarinet wood is full of?

I see hundreds and hundreds of clarinets each year, and have done for over three decades now - and in all that time I've never come across a clarinet that niffed due to bore oil going bad.

Stinky bores clogged with mouth gunge, yes; musty clarinets in mouldy, damp cases, yes - but never rancid oil.

Regards,
 
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