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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to be using an old Penzel Mueller as a learning project for some basic repairs (padding / key corks / joint tenons). I got a bargain on one and figure it won't be the end of the world if I mess it up as I learn ;) Anyway, the tenons all have metal rings/caps. On the upper join the rings are loose, i.e. they spin around. The lower joint tenon is still solid as a rock.

Is there a recommended method of removing and reattaching these solidly?

I can post pictures later if they're needed.

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I'm sure there are many other methods, but here's what I do....
Get a black garbage bag. Assuming you already have the tenon ring removed, take one "ply" of the garbage bag and place it on top of the upper joint, barrel, bell.....whatever and fairly gently push the tenon ring on to the tenon. If it's still quite loose, put another (second) piece over the tenon and place the ring over and on to the tenon again. If it's now a nice, snug fit, GENTLY take a rawhide mallet (or I guess a rubber mallet would work too) and tap the ring down so it sits where it should. Simply take a single edge razor blade and CAREFULLY cut the excess material away from the inner and outer diameter of the ring. You're done. Since you're dealing with the upper joint, be VERY careful if you place it on a table to tap the tenon ring down, to not bend/damage the lowest trill key that sits below the bottom of the top tenon. Make sense?
I've repeatedly used this method on customer and personal clarinets with great results. Just go slow, don't hammer the thing like you're pounding a nail in and you should be fine.
 

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I just melt shellac (the clear synthetic stuff from MusicMedic) on the inside of the tenon rings to glue/shim them into place. It works wonderfully and it's easily reversed if necessary.

Also: no hammering is necessary.
 

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From the original post it sounds like you are talking tenon rings since you mentioned the upper join(t). These are often slightly wrapped around the tenon shoulders and not really realistic to remove without damaging them. All replies so far referred only to socket ring, which when loose use different methods to repair.

Can you clarify that you meant tenon rings? The usual method is to just wick glue into them. Either super glue or epoxy. I prefer epoxy and heat it so it's much more liquidy but I use super glue sometimes.

If you meant socket rings, I can explain I don't like most of the methods suggested so far... and why I use shellac, but specifically not the synthetic type from Music Medic that was mentioned.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I meant tenon rings/caps. They are loose and I'd like to fix it while it's disassembled.


I am not talking about the rings on the tenon receivers.

Sent from my LGUS997 using Tapatalk
 

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jgreiner:

Your response makes sense. The clarinet has been stripped down for hand polishing the keys and new pads etc. So no worries about trill keys, just needle springs (ouch).

The rings are still attached to the ends of the tenons on the joints.

Sent from my LGUS997 using Tapatalk
 

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jgreiner:

Your response makes sense. The clarinet has been stripped down for hand polishing the keys and new pads etc. So no worries about trill keys, just needle springs (ouch).

The rings are still attached to the ends of the tenons on the joints.

Sent from my LGUS997 using Tapatalk
John, can you get them off? If not and they just rotate, I'd advise against forcefully pulling them off. Yeah, it might be a tad aggravating that they're loose and can turn, but that very well might simply be a humidity (or lack thereof) issue. Yeah, welcome to being stabbed by needle springs!

John
 

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It's good that we have clarified that we are discussing loose tenon rings.

If you try to just pull off the ones I instal then you would wreck the timber tenon shoulder!
It is very common for tenon rings to be sort of burnished/riveted over the shoulder, adjacent to the edge of the tenon cork.

I would remove the tenon cork if necessary, put on a surgical glove if you like, and use a finger to "massage" epoxy glue into that space under the ring.
But yes, this loose state could be because the timber has over-dried and shrunk. Perhaps try re-humidifying first.
 
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