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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!
I am a composer. I write a piece and in the woodwind section I need a glissando effect.
I have read about the glissando and portamento in Phillip Rehfeldt's book but I don't understand really.
The lip portamento I understand, it is bending down or up.

But what about the glissando with the coordination between the lip and fingers?

Look at the flute example:

And my question is: is it possible on the clarinet something like this:


What are the possibilities on the clarinet?? Between which notes are the glissandos possible without break, both up and downwards?

Thank you!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you a lot.
The Rhapsody in Blue is the most quoted glissando technique on the Internet. I tried to find another glissando, but no, only Gershwin!

Frankly, is it possible to play that Gershwin glissando - backwards, slowly?? From the top, down to the bottom?

Another thing: is it any difference in playing gliss on Clarinet Picc Eb, A and Bass Bb??
 

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just for historical accuracy, the clarinet gliss was played by Russ Morgan, the virtuoso with Paul Whiteman's band. He played it during a dress rehearsal as a joke and Gerswhin liked it and they used it on the premiere performance and forever afterwards. It was not in his original score.

Clarinetist with Whiteman was Ross Gorman -sorry too early for me to send post but the names are close.
 

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Thank you a lot.
The Rhapsody in Blue is the most quoted glissando technique on the Internet. I tried to find another glissando, but no, only Gershwin!

Frankly, is it possible to play that Gershwin glissando - backwards, slowly?? From the top, down to the bottom?
/QUOTE]

I can't think of an example.
There are some great examples of the upward glissando. Listen to the ending of Artie Shaw's Begin the Beguine and his Concerto for Clarinet. He was the real master of this technique. No one did it like Shaw.
 

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It is possible to 'gliss' on a closed hole instrument. You really need to concentrate on how you are opening the keys and bending the notes at the same time.
If you can't get it to sound smooth, try doing what I call a 'chromatic smear'. Not as nice sounding, but it will do in a pinch...
 
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