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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, in this vlog I showed how I transcribed a Charlie Rouse's idea and then how I transposed it in all Keys..
This vlog is a bit longer than the previous ones because this is me practicing, without (almost) any cut in the montage.
So you can find mistakes because practicing includes making mistakes!
I also explained at 7'54'' my personal considerations on transposing a phrase in all Keys.
Why is it useful?
How to do it in a constructive way.
What are for me the pros and cons?
Hope you like the video and chime in the discussion,
A new Vlog every monday.
Bye, Fabrizio




 

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Thanks for this - for me, I always try to repeat the lick 4 times (with no mistakes) in each key before moving on. Gonna add this one to my practice this week, we'll see how it goes.

I love Charlie Rouse :)

Your discussion (at least the English translation, I don't know Italian .... seems like some is left out?) is very good - finding keys that fit, working in keys that are "difficult", different finger patterns... nice. Sometimes playing something that is awkward or unusual leads to opening up a different area of the horn, or leads to a new idea.

Thanks man, nice to hear you (you sound great!) and nice to listen to an intelligent man's thought process.
 

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Nice lick and great video clip! I've been doing this kind of work on a set of phrases myself and it really is a fun thing to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
@Billy Baggins, thank to follow my videos!
@Jlima yes, working on a set of phrases is a good training.
The important thing is don't get trapped by repeating them in your solos!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Dig, I found very useful learning how to associate intervals to melodies that I can remember easily.
I want to do a vlog on this...
The melodies do not necessarily belong to jazz music, they can be whatever.
For instance I remember that "Star Wars" theme begins with a perfect fifth above, "Over the rainbow" with an octave and so on...
 

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Whatever it takes to ingrain it in muscle memory. Repeating it over and over, singing it or just memorizing the numbers as they relate to the chord and then transcribing it to other keys. also its helpful to play a song and add that into whatever chord that will work for it. also, you might take the lick and expand what you could do to it. inflections, add rests, enlongate or shorten some notes. But what your are doing i'm sure will improve your ear K
 

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Impressive.

Given twice the time, a running start, two cups of coffee, a 20 minute break, and a good nights sleep, I can pretty much achieve the same result.

Almost.

At least on a good day.

After my nap.
 

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Nice one, bb! I’m inspired to try the same, tomorrow. Albeit with a simpler phrase or lick, in my case.
I like the way you start out by singing, and keep coming back to singing in the different keys. I guess that might help internalize the lick so that it - or something similar - would come out in your soloing - without consciously thinking: now I’m gonna play that Charlie rouse lick.. that is, I suppose you hope to learn it, to forget it!
 

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Interesting where you say: look what happened- c# is easier than a flat. I’ve had that experience too; copying bits of melodies from sanborn maybe- where he’ll be playing something in c or f sharp - and me thinking - surprisingly this is a really nice key. I think sanborn does comin home baby in C sharp minor (on alto - e minor concert) for example. Here, you are consciously practicing in all keys. So I guess one big pro of this might be kind of learning different ‘pathways’ around the horn that you might avoid habitually, but then finding that you like them.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you Alistaircandlin. The point in not only playing the phrase in all 12 keys, but hearing and identifying its intervals. By Doing This kind of work regularly we can develop a better connection between what we hear and what we play. We should be able to hear a phrase and translate it immediately on the horn, this is the main goal of the improviser in my opinion. Of course singing is crucial to achieve this connection between the ear and the saxophone. And practicing in all keys forces our mind to think about intervals rather than just hitting the keys. Developing a good ear is also essential to engage an interplay with the other players. For example you can react to the piano comping by hearing the tensions that he/she puts in the chords and so on... Practicing in all keys opens to your mind and to your fingers new paths. If we develop a regular practice in 12 keys we can discover interesting things....and we will become more flexible.
 
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