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Discussion Starter #1
I have tried two horns in my life that had lightning response. The sound was bright and powerful and the sound was super flexible and easy to produce dynamics and vibrato on. It felt like playing with rocket fuel. On both of these examples I used my original d soloist short shank. One was Mark VI 223XXX tenor with a silver bell and another was a conn 10m from 1954. So these were amazing experiences. It makes me wonder why these horns played this way.

There are two other horns to note. One was 85XXX Mark VI tenor- The response was not as quick but the sound was rich and flexible. I also used the soloist D. Best overall tenor I've played. The other was my current alto Mark VI 67XXX same type of feeling but on alto.

I would be interested in hearing your thoughts on why the first two horns played like that. I feel that these are a beboper's dream set up/ feel.
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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Who put a silver bell on a MK VI? Maybe somebody just silver-plated it to get the Super 20 look.
My dream horn is good Selmer Paris. My current MK VI tenor I think is the best one I've had - all I have to do is get one more overhaul and I think it'll go all the way. So I guess I'm saying I play my dream horn every gig. Its up to me to get what it has out of it.
 

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I believe that 50% of what makes any horn dream-like is the quality of the set up.

Primarily, well-balanced spring tensions, just-right key heights, PERFECTLY sealing pads with no excess pressure needed/just the right thickness and density, and of course a perfectly matched mouthpiece (and reed?). This is the non-tangible aspect or dimension that one can't hunt down on eBay or by serial number!

But that said...there IS the other 50%~~!
 

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Considering I don't own a tenor, I'll start with it just being in my home for me to play. ;)

After that, great response with a solid amount of resistance. Smooth like butter and round like butter that's melted into a round shape. With keywork that doesn't just seal, it POPS closed when my fingers press down. And doesn't require mashing.

Also since I'm a pretty short dude, pinky keys that are easy to reach would be nice too.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
How can one go about identifying factors that make for a quick, powerful, bright response in a horn. If I wanted a mouthpiece like this I know what to get and how to explain it. I go to Theo Wanne and say give me the Shiva. I know why this mouthpiece sounds and responds the way it does. However for the saxophone itself- I have no clue as to what makes one respond better than another. Or why one "pops" when you the keys are closed as GoatTnder says etc etc.

How would you explain to a tech?Its quite confusing.
 

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That POP is just something you feel when the keys seal PERFECTLY. I've felt it on a clarinet once, but haven't experienced it on any sax yet. It's just... nice
 

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How can one go about identifying factors that make for a quick, powerful, bright response in a horn.
Oversized resos are part of the equation.
 
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