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Hello all,

I'm an alto player trying to improve my lead alto sound for jazz. I've been playing on a Jody Jazz HR 7M and just recently, my instructor let me borrow his Meyer 7M to get accustomed to. My instructor has noticed that my sound is "thin" and not "full". He wants me to sound like Cannonball and he's been having me transcribe Cannonball solos to get inside of his sound. According to my instructor, the Meyer 7M has a larger chamber than the Jody Jazz 7M. I have noticed a difference in my sound when playing on the Meyer and my sound is improving but I just wanted to get a little more informed on mouthpiece chambers. Generally speaking, the larger the chamber in a mouthpiece the more "focused" and "full" the player's sound will be? Thanks!
 

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Often you can just take in a little more mouthpiece in your embouchure and sound fuller.

The throat area of the chamber determines the basic focus of the mouthpiece. Smaller is more focused and larger more spread. Meyers typically have a subtle diameter reduction in the throat area. Not sure about the Jody.

Higher baffles can seem more focused to players. But these are louder and brighter.
 

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Focus, fullness and brightness are different issues.

focus (to keep it simple) is about how broad or wide the sound seems when it comes from the horn. A smaller chamber will give a more focused sound...like its a straight laser beam coming from the horn. A larger chamber will give more of a spread sound...it fills the space in a more broad sweeping beam. Neither is superior to another. Its personal taste. A player can have a full and big sound with any level of focus. He can also have a thin and bad sound on either chamber

A full sound is a product of skill, practice, a piece that is properly made and balanced.

A thin sound is the result of a player who is not using good breath support (think long tones)
A thin sound can also come from a crappy mpc that has a poorly adjusted baffle and about a thousand other variables.

So there is no perfect formula. The best solution for alto and a emerging player is a medium chamber piece that is well made. The rest is you and your horn...that needs to not be leaky.

...and for my shameless self promotion: https://phil-tone.com/alto/le-son Pictures and sound clips.

You cant buy a Cannonoball sound...lord knows Id be rich if you could. There are no chops in a box or perfect formula. Every player is different. The common denominator in all good players is hard work.
 
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