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The price is way over the top for something that can be so easily made from carbon fiber. I think $100 USD would be a more reasonable price.
 

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If you have to ask, the answer is probably "No".

Then again, keep your expectations low enough and you'll never be disappointed.
 

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This is the future! Actually these necks are probably only worth a few pounds/dollars in materials etc. But remember, TV's, fridges, radios used to be expensive years ago--now they're relatively cheap.
I remember mentioning carbon fibre flute headjoints to my son when he was studying industrial design at university and how expensive they would be--like fishing rods!--He told me that it would cost about £5.00 $12USD in carbon fibre, so there you are.
 

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I had a carbon fiber flute head joint at one time. It blew fantastically well but did not have the depth of tone that my wooden one has.
 

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This is the future! Actually these necks are probably only worth a few pounds/dollars in materials etc. But remember, TV's, fridges, radios used to be expensive years ago--now they're relatively cheap.
I remember mentioning carbon fibre flute headjoints to my son when he was studying industrial design at university and how expensive they would be--like fishing rods!--He told me that it would cost about £5.00 $12USD in carbon fibre, so there you are.
it might cost just a little bit more............. look up the matit flutes


 

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This is the future! Actually these necks are probably only worth a few pounds/dollars in materials etc. But remember, TV's, fridges, radios used to be expensive years ago--now they're relatively cheap.
I remember mentioning carbon fibre flute headjoints to my son when he was studying industrial design at university and how expensive they would be--like fishing rods!--He told me that it would cost about £5.00 $12USD in carbon fibre, so there you are.
Compare that to the cost of raw brass. Material cost is not the issue.
 

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bingo!
 

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I remember mentioning carbon fibre flute headjoints to my son when he was studying industrial design at university and how expensive they would be--like fishing rods!--He told me that it would cost about £5.00 $12USD in carbon fibre, so there you are.
The expense of carbon fiber is not only the fiber itself but how it's manufactured--there's a lot of labor that goes behind it. A simple wet-carbon overlay over a mold is easy. But then the resin overlay is more inconsistent, and doesn't give nearly the strength, lightness and quality of prepreg (aka dry carbon). Prepreg carbon already has hardened resin infused into it, which is a lot more expensive than just the fiber itself. Then to form that w/without using a negative mold, vacuum bagging and autoclaving while ensuring the curing temperature is consistent throughout... I don't know how much that would cost, but it's definitely not a $100 part. Prepreg carbon fiber parts are very expensive, which is why they're uncommon.

Then there's 3D looming, which is even more expensive...

I mean, the cost of raw materials of a sax is what, a couple hundred bucks maybe? Why should a pro horn cost over $3k? =)
 

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I did exotic materials repair to aircraft for Northwest Airlines. I agree with Sugaki, parts/material are not the pricing problem. Labor and quality control are. It also cost a bit to ramp up an autoclave and unless you have a large order or part count, would be a waste of time. One off production seems a lost cause price wise. I would guess that some smart guy could come up with carving from block two parts and gluing.

K
44 yrs of happy sax
 

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Since we are discussing interesting materials; could Michaelangelo have chiseled a marble sax? How would that sound? Stone body with standard brass keys?
 

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Actually, carbon fiber is incredibly strong and rigid. What you have to worry about is acoustic quality. It would probably sound like someone playing a grafton horn that is not being played by Charlie Parker.
carbon fibre is not known for it's acoustic properties, as Epic notes it's more familiar usage is where strength and rigidity are required but maintaining light weight, e.g. bike frames, formula 1 racing cars chassis, aircraft parts etc. Those necks might be very strong and light, but if they make horn sound like it's made of cardboard then they're worthless.
 
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