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Hey everyone
i'm making a list of jazz songs to learn and now Cantloupe island is last one i need to learn , when i hear it i can tell thats a 5 note melody but i cant figure it out alone .
:|
so please if anyone have a tab or the notes of it . that would be great
Thanks
 

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Pretty much a minor pentatonic.

Concert key.

F F Ab Bb Bb, Ab Bb C Eb F repeat
C Eb C Eb F F repeat.
Trickiest part is that the melody starts on beat four of the bar.

But hey, c'mon, don't be lazy. This tune is easy enough that
even beginners should be able to pick it out by ear.

Try singing along until you can sing it reasonbly well, then
find the notes on your horn.
 

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Just checked my Real Book. Kavala's notes are correct. But remember they're in concert key. You'll need to transpose up or down, depending on whether you're on alto or tenor.
 

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this looks like a good thread to ask this:
been looking at this song a little lately, trying to figure out the reasoning/theory behind the arrangement. if it is done by some formula (vs just creating by ear), i'm trying to figure out what that'd be...

G-...Eb7...E-(orD9) ok, so why the Eb7.?
.
listening to it, it sounds (to me) like a II or IV sound. is it a tritone sub for an A to lead towards the E-(D9)? i'm supposing the E- is functioning as the V7 of the harmony? is that what the Eb7 is about?
 

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G-...Eb7...E-(orD9) ok, so why the Eb7.?
.
listening to it, it sounds (to me) like a II or IV sound. is it a tritone sub for an A to lead towards the E-(D9)? i'm supposing the E- is functioning as the V7 of the harmony? is that what the Eb7 is about?
Not sure if this will answer your question, but I think of the Eb7 in Gmin (speaking in the tenor key) as the bVI7 chord. That is a very common chord to use in a minor tune, especially a minor blues (even though Cantaloupe Is isn't a 12-bar blues). The classic BB King tune "Thrill is Gone" is a good example.

The bVI7 often moves to the V7 (D7 in Gmin). Of course that doesn't happen in Cantaloupe Is. Instead it moves to a bridge in Emin. And no, I wouldn't say Emin is functioning as the "V7 of the harmony" since it is not a dominant chord. To my ear it is simply a 4-bar bridge.
 

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And no, I wouldn't say Emin is functioning as the "V7 of the harmony" since it is not a dominant chord. To my ear it is simply a 4-bar bridge.
I have always thought of this one as a 16 bar blues, kind of like Watermelon Man. Yeah, the turnaround isn't at all dominant, instead it sort of parks in this static sus-like thing with the RH in 4ths, but the Eb7 in bar 5 has a subdominant function -- can almost consider it a Cm (iv7) with Eb in the bass.
 

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this looks like a good thread to ask this:
been looking at this song a little lately, trying to figure out the reasoning/theory behind the arrangement. if it is done by some formula (vs just creating by ear), i'm trying to figure out what that'd be...

G-...Eb7...E-(orD9) ok, so why the Eb7.?
.
listening to it, it sounds (to me) like a II or IV sound. is it a tritone sub for an A to lead towards the E-(D9)? i'm supposing the E- is functioning as the V7 of the harmony? is that what the Eb7 is about?
JL's 'Thrill is Gone' analogy makes sense to me.
Also I agree with his 'bridge' idea for the E chord.

The basic chords for tenor are, Gmin7 - Eb9 - E11 (Bmin11).

You find many tunes where the harmony shifts up a minor third,
(Out of Nowhere is a good example). It happens a lot.
Often resolving down a half step to the II chord, then V - I.

If you consider that the Eb9 is similar to Bbmin7 then we
have a similar shift there, providing the same tension.
Instead of resolving the usual way, it goes to a bridging section.
The rhythm in the bridge is sort of an ostinato.

Another way to look at this is to think of the first two changes
as part of a blues sequence.
A blues in Gmin would go to Cmin (IV). C minor is the relative minor
of Eb, thus the Eb9.
If we think of the relative major of G minor then we have Bb major.
Eb9 is the second chord (IV) in a Bb blues .

Also the Eb9 chord shares many of notes of the G minor blues scale,
so there is a connection there as the whole tune is based around
the G minor petatonic and/or blues scales.

This is all a bit over analytical. It just sounds 'right'.
 

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I have always thought of this one as a 16 bar blues, kind of like Watermelon Man.
Yeah, I get this. I think more in terms of the feel of the phrasing, not so much the chord progression. Seems like you have to first get comfortable inside each of the chords, then let go and phrase over the 16 bars. Here are the masters playing it. See how they go outside while keeping the groove.
 
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