Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Administrator Emeritus
Joined
·
17,394 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Wow, can't imagine I never found this recording before! Perfect tenor and alto playing with a fantastic swinging rhythm section. Probably too much old school for most of you, but I share it anyway. One hour and 13 minutes of great music :).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXgiFcd2-7E

Tracks 01 to 12 are from a November 1960 recording session at the Jazz Cellar in San Francisco (without audience). Besides Webster on tenor and Hodges on alto it has Lou Levy on piano, Herb Ellis on guitar, Wilfred Middlebrooks on bass and Gus Johnson on drums.

Tracks 13-17 has Ray Nance on trumpet, Lawrence Brown on trombone, Emil Richards on vibes, Russ Freeman on piano, Joe Mondragon on bass, Mel Lewis on drums, and arranged by Jimmy Hamilton, in Los Angeles, January 31, 1961.

Track Listing:

01 Ben's Web (0:00)
02 Side Door (Don't Kid Yourself) (5:07)
03 Blues'll Blow Your Fuse (10:56)
04 I Can't Believe That You're In Love With Me (15:17)
05 Dual Highway (18:04)
06 Big Ears (21:20)
07 Shorty Gull (26:10)
08 Ifida (29:54)
09 Big Smack (34:31)
10 I'd Be There (39:23)
11 Just Another Day (44:39)
12 Lollalagin Now (50:28)
==============================
13 Exactly Like You (53:19)
14 I'm Beginning To See The Light (56:12)
15 Val's Lament (1:00:12)
16 Tipsy Joe (1:04:23)
17 Waiting On The Champagne (1:09:52)
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
16,652 Posts
Wonderful....thanks for sharing this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,063 Posts
I've been preaching about this session for years. One of my all-time favourites. In fact, only 2½ weeks ago, over on the thread entitled Does listening mostly to Tenor players affect your Alto playing? I posted:

On the wonderful session they recorded together at the Jazz Cellar in SF in November 1960, at times it is difficult to tell Hodges and Webster apart.
Great subject for a thread, mrpeebee. The more that know about this "sleeper" session the better.
 

·
Administrator Emeritus
Joined
·
17,394 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Awesome! Have you heard his "Back to Back Duke Ellington and Johnny Hodges Play the Blues"? I got it on Ebay for $7.00.
Yes, I have the first one on LP. Same tasteful playing and atmosphere as in above sessions :).

The more that know about this "sleeper" session the better.
That's for sure Mike :). I have a lot of music in my collection, but found above clip just by coincidence.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
1,365 Posts
Good find.. many thanks
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2012
Joined
·
3,107 Posts
Love it ! Old school ? Maybe. But the "post-bop old-school" rhythm section, specially Lou Levy's modernish chords give the session a very "fresh" mood. Thanks for sharing. Cellar ? Stellar Session.
BTW, just found it as CD or regular and legal dowload on Nozama.
 

·
Administrator Emeritus
Joined
·
17,394 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Lou Levy is great, but the complete rhythm sections swings like hell. I think Gus Johnson's drumming is a big part of that, seen him a few times live and when he is there the rhythm section always sounds great :).

Thanks for the Nozama tip too. I just downloaded the session as mp3, good enough for in the car!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
Thanks for posting this gem of a session! It's been on my favorites list for a long time. The love these two cats had for each other and the way they fed off each others' ideas is just fantastic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
587 Posts
Thanks for posting this gem of a session! It's been on my favorites list for a long time. The love these two cats had for each other and the way they fed off each others' ideas is just fantastic.
Yep. Old School is definitely "where it`s at nowadays" as they used to, and still say.LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Great stuff, much of this is on the Johnny Hodges Complete Verve sessions, I used to listen to it so many times repeatedly!
Like you said, not a lot of people will appreciate this stuff anymore - too much old school for them.
I personally love all that era (not pointing to the 50's and 60's when it was recorded, but to the 1930's & 40's)!
 

·
Administrator Emeritus
Joined
·
17,394 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I personally love all that era (not pointing to the 50's and 60's when it was recorded, but to the 1930's & 40's)!
Me too, I love the 30's, 40's and 50's (but try to stay open for other periods and music too).
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015
Joined
·
2,323 Posts
Me too, I love the 30's, 40's and 50's (but try to stay open for other periods and music too).
I have listened and through study absorbed the essence of Jazz as it is called be it Dixie, Modal, Free, Bop , Swing. I just can't appreciate Ben Webster's tone and mannerisms which has always annoyed me to no end. one exception though maybe Cottontail and the Fargo, North Dakota live dance sessions with Duke's band and what was the other solo, Jack the Bear but that is it. his constant whiny vibrato and sub toning everything he ever played along with the corny slides is just a bit much. he may have been influenced by Johnny Hodges to do his style on tenor but it doesn't translate. don't get me wrong the Tenor sax tradition is large and long with classic players but not this one.
 

·
Administrator Emeritus
Joined
·
17,394 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Tpr, I can understand and agree on some of your arguments. Still a lot of people enjoy Ben's unique way of playing and phrasing (me including). We all have different tastes :).
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015
Joined
·
2,323 Posts
Most definitely mrpeebee as I respect your tastes and opinion and that is all I meant with my comments and tried to stir up a little controversy. Ben Webster will always be an Icon for many folks worldwide, just not for me. his ballad playing was on another level but to me he never really grew or moved beyond his niche as a stylist since the 1940's.
 

·
Administrator Emeritus
Joined
·
17,394 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
...to me he never really grew or moved beyond his niche as a stylist since the 1940's.
Fully agree, that's actually also true for some of my other hero's from the swing area. For instances Arnett Cobb and Illinois Jacquet played for years often the same solo's, with only some small variations. I think that was also because the people likes them to play that way (think Flying Home). That's why I often love to hear those players play the Blues, it's if like only then they really can be 'free'.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015
Joined
·
2,323 Posts
You are so right on that mrpeebee. I do like your friends in the Netherlands who play that tough tenor style and really put on a show. I saw a few YouTube clips where they jam in a local bar with my friend John Dikeman playing the blues and they all really killed on every song and solo. of course John goes nuts on his solo but also in the tradition.
 

·
Administrator Emeritus
Joined
·
17,394 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Yes tpr, that jam-session with John Dikeman, Rinus Groeneveld and Wouter Kiers playing in Leiden (NL) was great. I was in the public and it was much better live then on the clips (which I posted >here< on SOTW). For John it was something different, he normally operates in the Free Jazz sceen here in Amsterdam (I've met John a few times for mouthpiece check-outs, we both love big tips).

Still a lot of the 'Tough Tenors' I know also love Ben Webster, who in a way can be seen (like Coleman Hawkins, Herschel Evans and Joe Thomas) as a big influence for players in that style. Which brings us back to the original topic of this thread, Ben Webster and Johnny Hodges :).
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top