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Discussion Starter #1
I just busted the tip off my favorite vintage mouthpiece. No one is remaking these, I'm certain of it. I'm wondering if it's possible to make a mold with one of those DIY kits, pour in some resin and make a copy, then finish carving the busted part with a dremel tool? Am I completely out of my depth here, or can it be done? Thanks.
 

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Im thinking you are pushing your luck a really long way.

How bad is the piece busted. There are a few guys, Mojo is one of them, who can fix some pretty damaged pieces if you have all the parts.

Id suggest posting a picture of what you have.

I think you are far out of your depth here.

Im also curious as to what the piece is. Is the issue that its expensive to replace or hard to find?
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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I agree, out of your depth with DIY folding.

I work with Ed Pillinger who creates mouthpieces using molds, there is a lot more to it than just making a mould and pouring in the resin. he has spent a long time research the best resin to use, from all kind of points of view: integrity and strength, acoustics, food grade safety etc. For obvious reasons he does not publicise wexactly what it is or the formulae he uses. After molding the piece must be hand finished, putting on the facing curve, flattening the table and many other things.

BUT the good news is for a reasonable price he will make a copy of any mouthpiece provided there are no issues with intellectual property rights. The ones he has done for me play exactly like the originals.
 

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I agree, out of your depth with DIY folding.

I work with Ed Pillinger who creates mouthpieces using molds, there is a lot more to it than just making a mould and pouring in the resin. he has spent a long time research the best resin to use, from all kind of points of view: integrity and strength, acoustics, food grade safety etc. For obvious reasons he does not publicise wexactly what it is or the formulae he uses. After molding the piece must be hand finished, putting on the facing curve, flattening the table and many other things.

BUT the good news is for a reasonable price he will make a copy of any mouthpiece provided there are no issues with intellectual property rights. The ones he has done for me play exactly like the originals.
This is probably your best bet. Dr Pillinger has been doing this for a very long time, makes accurate molds and is more than qualified to make sure it will play after. Not many people around that can do that!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Im thinking you are pushing your luck a really long way.

How bad is the piece busted. There are a few guys, Mojo is one of them, who can fix some pretty damaged pieces if you have all the parts.

Id suggest posting a picture of what you have.

I think you are far out of your depth here.

Im also curious as to what the piece is. Is the issue that its expensive to replace or hard to find?
The entire tip is gone. It hit the pavement hard, took more than a quarter inch off the top. It shattered and I only found one little piece of the lost tip. I'd be surprised if anyone could repair it and for any reasonable price. I should have been using a neckstrap.
 

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The entire tip is gone. It hit the pavement hard, took more than a quarter inch off the top. It shattered and I only found one little piece of the lost tip. I'd be surprised if anyone could repair it and for any reasonable price. I should have been using a neckstrap.
Well, it all depends on your level of skills. I work with a guy who does bronze castings for fun, using patterns made by 3-d printing using lost-wax casting wax in the printer, I also know people who have trouble figuring out how to use a screwdriver to tighten up a loose doorknob.

At my level of skills I'd probably use something like modeling clay to make a rough form on the mouthpiece to roughly approximate the shape of the missing bit, making sure to leave plenty of stock for finishing, then I'd use some kind of a filled epoxy to make the missing piece (oversize), then once it sets up I'd work it down with files and rifflers and scrapers till the inside and outside looked like what used to be there, then I'd reface it. I think I have the skills to do this and the results would probably be fine. I am a professional mechanical engineer and have spent hundreds if not thousands of hours making stuff with my hands since maybe the age of 6; and I am familiar with tight tolerance work and how to measure things with a high degree of accuracy.

So you just have to make an honest assessment of your own experience and skills and decide - throw it away; take on the job yourself; send it to someone and pay to have it repaired.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, it all depends on your level of skills. I work with a guy who does bronze castings for fun, using patterns made by 3-d printing using lost-wax casting wax in the printer, I also know people who have trouble figuring out how to use a screwdriver to tighten up a loose doorknob.

At my level of skills I'd probably use something like modeling clay to make a rough form on the mouthpiece to roughly approximate the shape of the missing bit, making sure to leave plenty of stock for finishing, then I'd use some kind of a filled epoxy to make the missing piece (oversize), then once it sets up I'd work it down with files and rifflers and scrapers till the inside and outside looked like what used to be there, then I'd reface it. I think I have the skills to do this and the results would probably be fine. I am a professional mechanical engineer and have spent hundreds if not thousands of hours making stuff with my hands since maybe the age of 6; and I am familiar with tight tolerance work and how to measure things with a high degree of accuracy.

So you just have to make an honest assessment of your own experience and skills and decide - throw it away; take on the job yourself; send it to someone and pay to have it repaired.
Is hardened epoxy safe to put in your mouth? I was thinking of using some of these mold making kits I see advertised. And I was considering doing exactly what you're describing, making a new tip then gluing it on somehow.
 

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Is hardened epoxy safe to put in your mouth? I was thinking of using some of these mold making kits I see advertised. And I was considering doing exactly what you're describing, making a new tip then gluing it on somehow.
Do it ON the mouthpiece. Don't try to make a perfectly shaped bit and glue it on, use the adhesive property of the epoxy itself to attach to the piece.

I have never heard of any safety issues with cured epoxy. I think all those dental adhesives are probably a version of UV-cured epoxies. If you are worried I am sure there are "food grade" epoxies.

If the replaced portion will get under your front teeth you'd probably want to put a tooth patch there as I suspect the epoxy won't be as hard as the original hard rubber.
 

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Is hardened epoxy safe to put in your mouth? I was thinking of using some of these mold making kits I see advertised. And I was considering doing exactly what you're describing, making a new tip then gluing it on somehow.
You may wish to look at the MSDS or contact the manufacturer. Don't take anyone's word for it on this forum unless they have the real data.
 

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The entire tip is gone. It hit the pavement hard, took more than a quarter inch off the top. It shattered and I only found one little piece of the lost tip. I'd be surprised if anyone could repair it and for any reasonable price. I should have been using a neckstrap.
You cannot make a mold to copy something that is missing.
 

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I'm aware of that. But can you graft the tip from another mouthpiece onto it and file it to an approximation of the original?
If you are satisfied with a coarsely filed tip from another mouthpiece glued onto the carcass of your old mouthpiece, you may be just as happy with something different that works.
 

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I'm aware of that. But can you graft the tip from another mouthpiece onto it and file it to an approximation of the original?
It will probably be able to make a sound... but it would not be reasonable to expect much better from such a coarse repair.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
If you are satisfied with a coarsely filed tip from another mouthpiece glued onto the carcass of your old mouthpiece, you may be just as happy with something different that works.
Is the tip that fundamental to the sound? I always thought it was the chamber shape that made the mouthpiece.
 

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Is the tip that fundamental to the sound? I always thought it was the chamber shape that made the mouthpiece.
1. Other members may own a Brilhart of the same model (I don't...) and could communicate detailed pictures/measurements of the damaged area to a refacer, if you chose to have your mouthpiece professionally repaired.
2. "I always thought it was the chamber shape that made the mouthpiece": that's the problem with statements taken out of context.
 
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