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Discussion Starter #1
I don't have it with me but it plays ok (apparently).
Would you bother trying to reinforce/repair this line crack?

 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Playing "OK" is not a good enough reason to repair this mouthpiece IMO. If it plays beautifully, or wonderfully or awesomely and especially if its the one for you, then a repair is worth doing. Or get it cloned.

It may last a long time like that, or it might just split in two when you least expect it or want it to.

But as it just plays "OK" I wouldn't worry, I'd get a better mouthpiece or have those rails looked at, they appear uneven though maybe that's just the cameral angle. What is it, a ROC?
 

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If it plays great and the cracked area doesn't move back and forth with a little finger pressure, I wouldn't worry about it too much personally. However, it looks like that crack extends all the way into the side rail, which is probably not good... This means the reed is vibrating against a cracked surface... Like mentioned above if it plays great, and it doesn't move around with slight pressure physically, and you're worried about it changing after a reface, I'd probably not worry about it.
But, if you were interested in getting it reinforced, I'd guess that one way of getting that done would be to fill the area up with JB Weld which is a great filler, but after that it'd really need to be refaced to make sure the curve is all in line since the JB Weld would have to be sanded down to match the height of the rest of the side rail.
Super Glue, or cyanoacrylate glues, can also be used to soak down into the cracked area and strengthen it, but the same thing would apply, it'd need to be touched up by a refacer to make sure everything's in line after the glue cures.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Playing "OK" is not a good enough reason to repair this mouthpiece IMO. If it plays beautifully, or wonderfully or awesomely and especially if its the one for you, then a repair is worth doing. Or get it cloned.

It may last a long time like that, or it might just split in two when you least expect it or want it to.

But as it just plays "OK" I wouldn't worry, I'd get a better mouthpiece or have those rails looked at, they appear uneven though maybe that's just the cameral angle. What is it, a ROC?
It is a Roc Britone - a guy is selling it at a discounted price and I guess it is worth have a go (didn't I mentioned I wansn't buying anymore MPs? :faceinpalm:).
Surely there must be a way to secure or stop that crack developing any further...or just, spend about 3 times more and buy another one [rolleyes].
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If it plays great and the cracked area doesn't move back and forth with a little finger pressure, I wouldn't worry about it too much personally. However, it looks like that crack extends all the way into the side rail, which is probably not good... This means the reed is vibrating against a cracked surface... Like mentioned above if it plays great, and it doesn't move around with slight pressure physically, and you're worried about it changing after a reface, I'd probably not worry about it.
But, if you were interested in getting it reinforced, I'd guess that one way of getting that done would be to fill the area up with JB Weld which is a great filler, but after that it'd really need to be refaced to make sure the curve is all in line since the JB Weld would have to be sanded down to match the height of the rest of the side rail.
Super Glue, or cyanoacrylate glues, can also be used to soak down into the cracked area and strengthen it, but the same thing would apply, it'd need to be touched up by a refacer to make sure everything's in line after the glue cures.
If superglue is an option then it is worth having a go - at least there is a quick and easy way to stop that crack.
A crack so close to the tip doesn't feel right though - I guess the superglue or other stuff is going to affect the way the MP vibrates.
 

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...I guess the superglue or other stuff is going to affect the way the MP vibrates.
IMO, no. Most mouthpieces do not vibrate significantly. It is the air column inside the sax that vibrates. If you can split the crack open, try some super glue in it (regular, not the gel type). If it pops off, you can glue it back on. If it will not split open, then t is solid enough to play without a repair. Some light facing work may be needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
IMO, no. Most mouthpieces do not vibrate significantly. It is the air column inside the sax that vibrates. If you can split the crack open, try some super glue in it (regular, not the gel type). If it pops off, you can glue it back on. If it will not split open, then t is solid enough to play without a repair. Some light facing work may be needed.
Thanks a lot for the very useful information....
Never thought a split mouthpiece could be made playable with just super glue?
I still don't get the final point about the refacing...I suppose, that would be needed only if a crack was repaired with super glue - this ROC is still in one piece (in my knowledge).
Still, it's seems good news, maybe I'm in for a real bargain?!
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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If the two surfaces on either side of the cracka are aligned with each other, then you will not need facing work. You may just get away with a light hand sanding with very fine sandpaper. But there is a good chance that the mouthpiece did not have a good facing on it before it got cracked.
 

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If there is no material missing, and it is just a hairline crack, you can flow ultra thin formula cyanoacrylate (this formula is available at hobby shops) into it, and capillary action will draw it only into the crack itself, thus securing it. It doesn't look like anything has shifted on the piece that needs realigning.

Make sure that you remove all moisture before doing this, or the glue will fume up and leave a white, smokey deposit around the application area.
 
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