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I'm gonna guess that you'd have to be happy with a hybrid, MkVI/Grafton. ;)

I wonder how it does on reeds?
 

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Skeptical - how does a laser imaging system measure internal dimensions???

Regardless of the printer, I need the imaging system.

PM me if you have info on the company.
 

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Skeptical - how does a laser imaging system measure internal dimensions???

Regardless of the printer, I need the imaging system.

PM me if you have info on the company.
Read the comments on the video, one guy kind of explains it. Something to do with a CAD program, I have no idea what that means
 

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This could be really interesting. Think if someone had a mouthpiece printed. It could settle if material makes a difference or not, because all the dimensions are the same.
 

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Just checked the website - spatial resolution is pretty low.

http://www.rapido3d.co.uk/

No Mk VIs from this tool - no "exact" copies of mouthpieces either.

Regarding "does material matter" - the only output is going to be a polymer-based material (no metals). If you want to test the "does material matter" issue, ask any of the mouthpiece makers using CNC to run batches of various materials.

Chances are that you won't believe them regardless of the outcome.
 

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I saw a similar machine in the late lamented British Motor Industry some 18 years ago.
This machine consisted of a bath of clear gel...a shape, determined by computer controlled lasers, would solidify the top, microscopically thin, layer, & the item would gradually "grow" out of the gel as a clear solid plastic.
It was used primarily to make experimental cylinder heads & manifolds for air flow work; saving all the time & trouble of either machining or casting the required unit from aluminium....almost magical.
 

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Skeptical - how does a laser imaging system measure internal dimensions???
The machine I described in my last post worked off sectioned "drawings", or rather, instructions. It knew therefore, & replicated, the internal measurements....It would be perfect for reproducing ultra accurate mouthpieces.
 

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I can understand printing a 3D solid object; it's the moving parts which trip all my circuits.
 

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I've checked into it some more.

As I suspected, the laser imaging gives the outer 3-D surface only - a user defines the internal dimensions in CAD. The printer then prints the assembly layer by layer.

A person could, with this printer or similar, define a ball within a ball or a bolted assembly with a blind head, that could otherwise not exist.

The printer techology is easy. I was hoping that imaging had jumped a quantum...
 

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As I see it, all the parts are "printed" separately......assembly follows.
I don't know about that. He says of the object displayed at about the 1:00 mark, "It moves and it was printed as one piece." Also, the wrench comes out of the printer powder with the moving red "ring" (as he calls it) intact.
 

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on the other hand flutes are already being printed, not very well, but they are



and a simple toy, recorder

 

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I don't know about that. He says of the object displayed at about the 1:00 mark, "It moves and it was printed as one piece." Also, the wrench comes out of the printer powder with the moving red "ring" (as he calls it) intact.
Correct. If you consider each object as a series of planes, one can easily imagine building a 3-D object layer by layer with spaces between moving parts. That's not the hard part. Reducing the porosity of a similar part made by higher power lasers fusing powdered metal is more demanding.
 

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how does a laser imaging system measure internal dimensions???
Couldn't they make a scanner device small enough to fit inside the neck and body tube of the saxophone? If that capability exists, they could run it through the horn like a swab.
 

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Couldn't they make a scanner device small enough to fit inside the neck and body tube of the saxophone? If that capability exists, they could run it through the horn like a swab.
I've tried using small sensors with scanner/receiver in the same package. The difficulty lies in maintaining a reference frame when dealing with a bore.

The internal dimensions that I was referring to the text you quoted is the matter of measuring dimensions internal to a solid body, ie. measuring the dimensions of a surface that cannot be illuminated by the laser.
 

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The internal dimensions that I was referring to the text you quoted is the matter of measuring dimensions internal to a solid body, ie. measuring the dimensions of a surface that cannot be illuminated by the laser.
The thickness of the metal? Would a sonar component work?
 

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Not to take the wind out of anybody's sail - but this is known as "Rapid Prototyping" - and it has been around - in different forms - for decades.

Regards Bo
 

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Not to take the wind out of anybody's sail - but this is known as "Rapid Prototyping" - and it has been around - in different forms - for decades.
True. The twist is in the imaging of the object - and that still has room for improvement.
 
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