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Your playing is about where you would want it to be in your situation, equipment, etc. You may want to work on a fuller tone by working with your teacher and setup changes. You have a good feel for the style, and that will improve with time and work, too. You seem like you are about ready to expand your vision with the improvisation into more linear thinking. Listening to Hodges and learning from one of the very best will help you, too.
 

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First, I applaud you for putting yourself out there and asking for critiques. Brave.

You have nice high points during your solo. Perhaps a little tentative at the start of the tune. I can hear some real potential in your playing. At this stage I would recommend that you find a wonderful teacher who can give you direction and advice. Transcribe whatever interests you. Maybe play along with some aebersold's. Listen to everything that you can. On alto there's the greats such as Paul Desmond, Johnny Hodges, Charlie Parker, Phil Woods, Art Pepper, and Kenny Garrett as well as a host of other killer players. See who resonates with you. We're all inspired by someone and remember that they were inspired by other players along the way. Read about them and jazz in general. Educate yourself by visiting the library. Watch the players you like on youtube.

Last year I reviewed a couple of Greg Fishman's books for Sax On The Web. I would recommend that you check out his etude book. Should be a nice book to work out of a bit.

If for some reason you can't find a teacher in your area I would recommend that you consider working with a teacher who can listen to recordings of you playing and give you regular feedback. Tim Price at timepricejazz.com does this over the phone which is a pretty cool service if you don't have someone local.

Another thing you might try is to get a free recording program like audigy and record yourself along with a play along.

Finally, practice as much as you can. Have a goal in mind. If you want to make music your life then it's time to start thinking about what college will be able to provide a way for you to accomplish your goals. It's also a good time to figure out what you are going to have to be able to play to get accepted to their program. Good luck and keep playing.
 

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We're nearly in the same situation.
Nice to hear someone around the same age as myself play so well. Nice tune as well, you wouldn't happen to have a transcription handy? I wanna have a shot and see how i'd compare.
 

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no unfortunately I had to turn in my music today. :( so no copies. although you should be able to buy if fairly easily. But I will see if i can grab it again for ya Twombles :) I will pm you if i get it.

I used to take private lessons, for about a year i took them. Then i moved and never got set up with them in colorado. UNC and CSU are both within 20 miles so I know of a ton of great teachers around here. Such as Peter Sommers or Dr. Dalkhe (spelling?).

I dont understand the comment about expanding my improv into more linear thinking. Could you explain that more?

I'm not going into music for a living. Engineering is more my career of interest. I have to have music in my life though, and I dont see myself ever not playing in my lifetime.
 

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eRock! Very nice and a good inspiration for the rest of us! Keep playing and look up a teacher, you sure are worth it:D

I am an engineer, who has come to the same conclusion as you: I need to have music in my life one way or another. I am more than sorry it took me 40 years to realize that...
 

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Nice playing. Keep at it. Continue tone development. Maybe get a copy of Dave Liebmans book "developing a personal sound". Spend some time on the piano learning how chords work. That's the other direction - vertical thinking. Meaning harmony is vertical , melody is horizontal. But you can use vertical knowledge in your lines. When one chord changes to the next what are the chord tone movements that most define the transition. (it's generally the half steps) Think about how you might use those defining movements melodically.
 
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