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Can anyone really play the sax? Could someone have oral characteristics that simply makes playing with proper technique impossible?
 

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There are many ways to form a 'proper' embouchure. I would think that the person would have to have some SERIOUS oral deformaty in order to prevent forming any type of embouchure at all. Like not having any lips or tongue....
If there's a will there's a way so to speak.
 

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Can anyone really play the sax? Could someone have oral characteristics that simply makes playing with proper technique impossible?
Since you've couched it in those terms, probably.
 

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I don't think it would be common. You would have to have a pretty severe deformity. If you can chew food normally you can probably form a useable sax embouchure.




:glasses7:
 

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A tracheotomy could be an issue.
 

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Which raised the oddball question for me: Anyone here play with dentures? Just curious . . .
 

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In one biography of Trane, it said he had a very painful cavities because he had quite a sweet tooth and fear of dentists or something. Denture? Obviously, respiratory problems and disabilities of the arms and hands would be a problem. I would think it unwise for someone interested in playing sax to get a lip piercing, especially in mid-lower-lip, but I wouldn't know from personal experience.
 

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Which raised the oddball question for me: Anyone here play with dentures? Just curious . . .
My teeth are still OK, lucky me, but I've played with lots of folks who have full plates. Trumpet players too, which might be a little more difficult.
 

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I recall Phil Woods attributing his switch from his Mark VI to his 82Z to the change in his ability to get his unique sound any more because of the changes caused by his dentures.
 

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I just thought the thread title was hilarious in and of itself (I interpreted it in a totally different way)....so, 5 points for that alone....
 

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Which raised the oddball question for me: Anyone here play with dentures? Just curious . . .
I play with dentures. I lost my front four teeth after a year of learning clarinet. I thought it was a year wasted but I soon forgot about the dentures and got on with it. As it happened, the dentures corrected an underbite that I didn't know I had and, once corrected, a lot of those discussions of embouchure with diagrams made a lot more sense.

I've been on SOTW for long enough to know I have to make this statement: when I say I forgot about the dentures, that doesn't mean I left them in the glass when I went to play. I forgot about them in the sense that I no longer let them concern me. Of course that doesn't stop anyone having a laugh about false fingering. Restrain yourself, Lord Rooty!
 

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I once had a student who broke his two lower frontteeth while skating. After more than a year both still haven't been refurbished and he really is having problems with the embouchure because of this.
Also there are deformations on the lip possible which could make it difficult to close the lips properly.
And a colleague told me about problems he had with a student who had a lip piercing.
But not only the head could cause problems.
I once had a student with slightly deformed fingers, it took me a while to find a horn that would be playable for the student with only minor adjustments.
 

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There might be people who have problems keeping the airstream going through the mouth and not up through the nose when blowing into the sax.

I think that if a very young student starts to early using a strong reed this could become a negative side effect.
If someone was born with such a condition it could be difficult/impossible to play even using the most soft reeds.
 

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Depends on the oral characteristics you have in mind.
Can you clarify for a better diagnosis.

Though unless it is something very severe or unusual you should be fine.
E.g. I'm missing the front upper teeth and play fine with lip embouchure.
 

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I play with dentures. I lost my front four teeth after a year of learning clarinet. I thought it was a year wasted but I soon forgot about the dentures and got on with it. As it happened, the dentures corrected an underbite that I didn't know I had and, once corrected, a lot of those discussions of embouchure with diagrams made a lot more sense.

I've been on SOTW for long enough to know I have to make this statement: when I say I forgot about the dentures, that doesn't mean I left them in the glass when I went to play. I forgot about them in the sense that I no longer let them concern me. Of course that doesn't stop anyone having a laugh about false fingering. Restrain yourself, Lord Rooty!
People used to ask my grandad if he had his own teeth. He always answered 'Yep, bought and paid for 'em myself!'
 

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Sigurd Rascher used to ask, "Why doesn't every musical person play the saxophone?" He reasoned that it might take as little as 90 days to get the basics down, and a world of possibilities then beckons to you. Too bad not every musical person felt that way.
 
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