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Discussion Starter #1
It's been my aspiration to own a professional model saxophone ever since "clicking in" with playing the sax, this year.
For saxophone brands, I'm mainly looking at Selmer and Keilwerth, but on the weekend, I'm going to go out and try everyone I can get my hands on, so I'm open to suggeestions about other brands.
I want a saxophone that can really sing. Mainly a jazzer, I also want to play legit stuff too. Thinking of going to college with sax.

Anyway, any suggestions would be much appreciated. Thanks :D
 

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Sounds to me that you are looking for a Yanagisawa ;)
Definatley give one a try if you can
Alto or Tenor ?
 

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Yanagisawas rock!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Oh, I definently will if I can get my hands on one :p

What model should I be looking for? I haven't done much reading on Yanis.

Thanks btw,

-Bryan.
 

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If you want something that "sings", look at vintage Bueschers. I haven't seen a modern alto yet that can touch either my Big or TH&C.

Much depends on what size saxophone you are looking for although Yanagisawa is a good recommendation in any size but bass. Look for whatever model you can find and play 'em. DAVE
 

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Just out of curiosity, are pro saxes any more in tune than student models? Because I really hate having to lip up and lip down all over my saxophone...
 

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AnotherClarinetist said:
Just out of curiosity, are pro saxes any more in tune than student models?
That depends on the student model. Some like the YAS 23 have a very good scale. Others like the Armstrong have horrible intonation. Generally speaking the modern "pro" model saxes are made to play quite well in tune, but even on these instrument the "typical" out of tune notes still exist to some degree. They are 3rd space C# (flat), 4th line D (sharp), top ledger line A (very sharp). There are of course others, but these are the most glaring in my experience. The set-up, embouchure, and mouthpiece pitch of the performer have a great deal to do with intonation as well. Certain setups and playing habits mitigate a sax's intonation problems, while others tend to exacerbate them.

AnotherClarinetist said:
Because I really hate having to lip up and lip down all over my saxophone...
Playing a saxophone is a lot like singing in that you hear the pitch in your mind and then make subtle changes in the throat/oral cavity/airstream to produce that sound. The "lip" comes in to play only when the other adjustments by themselves are not sufficient. For those who hate to "lip" notes, the piano is an excellent choice. :)
 

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Believe me, jbt, altering just the airstream is not nearly enough to bring my saxophone in tune. And I always hear that high A is the sharpest note, but for me, it's my flattest note - about 20 cents flat even with about half a centimeter of cork showing! It annoys the heck out of me. Is it a bad thing that the Selmer alto sax my mom bought for me is stamped "made in Taiwan"?

By the way, piano's fun too, but my fingers are better coordinated playing one note at a time...
 

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jbtsax said:
For those who hate to "lip" notes, the piano is an excellent choice. :)
Or accordian....

But back on a serious note, you should really take a look at the pro Yamahas. For what you described, the Custom 875EX and the YAS-62II would be good choices. What the heck, check out an 82Z also!

The good news is that you're going about this the right way - by trying out every horn you can get your hands on.

Good luck.

Frank
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm quite excitied :D

I mean, it's going to be a huge investment, but I think it'll be worth it.

So what do you guys think of Keilwerth, Selmer, or Cannonball?
 

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Selmers and KWs are fine instruments. Yanagasawa is far and away the best bang for the buck. In several side by sides with students, A901s have beat all comers. Pro Yamahas are excellent, too. Cannonballs, Mauriats, etc, are good, but not as good, and fall down on resale value.
 

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AnotherClarinetist said:
Believe me, jbt, altering just the airstream is not nearly enough to bring my saxophone in tune. And I always hear that high A is the sharpest note, but for me, it's my flattest note - about 20 cents flat even with about half a centimeter of cork showing! It annoys the heck out of me. Is it a bad thing that the Selmer alto sax my mom bought for me is stamped "made in Taiwan"?
Are you saying that your Selmer student sax plays high A 20 cents flat with the mouthpiece pushed almost all the way on the cork? If this is correct, check the opening of the key you close when you go from A to G. Is it closer to the tonehole on the body of the sax than the keys on either side of it? If so this might be the problem. Also check that the opening in the neck octave tube (called the pip) is not obstructed and that the neck octave key opens at least 1/8" or more when you play high A. If you find any of these, take your horn to a repair tech and have it checked. There may be a mechanical problem that is causing your sax to play that note so out of tune.

John
 

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Discussion Starter #14
What would be the different tonal qualities between Keilwerth, Selmer, Yamaha, and Yanagasiwa then?

Sorry for all the questions :p, just I want some background info before I go out and buy a sax.
 

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I would recomend figuring out what models you are looking at purchasing. That way you can view mulitple threads, and get a better opinion overall what horn is right for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Oh, ok.

For Yani, I'd probably be going for an A-991, or an A-901.
Selmer, I'd go for a Series II or III depending on my tastes.
Keilwerth, either SX90, SX90R, or the Shadow.
Yamaha, I'd probably try out the YAS-875EX, or the YAS-82z
 

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Yanagisawas are bright. Keilwerths are generally dark cept for the nickel silver models and shadow whuich have brighter overtones. Selmer is middle of the road and Yamahas are generaly bight.
 

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You'll know it...

sod

You can research till the cows come home, but he best and most fun way is book an afternoon at a well-stocked shop. I speak from experience. Did the forum trawling, decided that a ref 36 tenor was right for me given all the descriptions of its tone. Went to the shop and played it side by side with three ref 54s. Came home with one of the 54s.

Only you will know, but it's fun finding out, and suprisingly easy to tell what you like and what you hate when you're standing there trying to get music out of the things.

S.
 

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yes, just like Slobberchops sez...last time I bought a new (alto) sax, I went to the store thinking I'd want a Keilwerth (based on the what I'd read) and I came out with a Yamaha Custom...I was shocked.
 

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jbtsax said:
Are you saying that your Selmer student sax plays high A 20 cents flat with the mouthpiece pushed almost all the way on the cork? If this is correct, check the opening of the key you close when you go from A to G. Is it closer to the tonehole on the body of the sax than the keys on either side of it? If so this might be the problem. Also check that the opening in the neck octave tube (called the pip) is not obstructed and that the neck octave key opens at least 1/8" or more when you play high A. If you find any of these, take your horn to a repair tech and have it checked. There may be a mechanical problem that is causing your sax to play that note so out of tune.

John
Yeah, that's as far down the cork as I shove it. Almost all my notes are flat, except for a few that are insanely sharp. The guys at the repair shop said it was fine and that I needed to adjust my embouchure for different notes and make it tighter, overall. They said that it was a very good horn and that I needed to practice in front of the tuner more. Yeah, right! I tried out a Yamaha 475 yesterday, and I could play most of the notes in tune, without shoving my mouthpiece all the way down the cork. All the keys seemed to move easier, and the sound was a lot smoother. I'm thinking of trying some other saxophones when we have the time and trading in my student Selmer for a better horn. Not sure if my mom really wants to buy me a pro horn, though...
 
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