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Which is more important?

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Just out of curiosity, when choosing a new horn what do you look for, what makes one horn stand out from the rest for you?
 

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I can best explain my preferences and horn assessment criteria, but by no means are they right for everyone.

I know within the first 3 notes I play on a horn if it is a winner or not. A great horn just sounds good to you ear and has that buzz and vibrates. When I find a winner, then I really put it through its paces. Subtone notes moving air, but playing as softly as possible to low Bb tells me about play condition and voicing of the horn. Then, I check flexability of tone and see if the horn can talk, I.E whether the horn has that lyrical quality. Tuning on most pro horns made in the last 50 years isn't really the issue unless you find a dog. Since there are so many schools of thought about the so called perfect horn, let's say I migrate more toward the Selmer sound rather than the large bore sound. You might play a 10m that really does it for you, and you wouldn't be wrong for choosing one. My point? Play whatever horn you can get your hands on, new or vintage, and if it sounds good and feels comfortable, don't worry about the name on the bell. Play the horn in person unless you deal with a straight shooter like Randy Jones.
 

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Sound. For me, if the sound isn't there nothing else matters that much.
Of the choices given above, response.
 

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Sound. For me, if the sound isn't there nothing else matters that much.
Of the choices given above, response.
on the same page with Gary for this.

sound, I chose my recent Yanagisawa A992 alto as it is closer to my "tonal" concept. in terms of response, build quality, etc, the horns have "standard" professional baseline quality.
 

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For most people lucky enough to live in a country where there is sax shop filled with myriads of saxes, I agree on the no.1 poll. BUT, if you are in where you have no chance of even touching the thing, then "Manufacturer's Reputation" must be in 1st priority list. That way one is very assured the sax is in the best order when it arrives. Response, etcs...... will have to live with whatever that comes out of the box. But, I was lucky to come across this link before buying http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RqEoasEzyB4&NR=1. Few days later I bought that sax. It's been 2 yrs of playing it now.
 

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I can best explain my preferences and horn assessment criteria, but by no means are they right for everyone.

I know within the first 3 notes I play on a horn if it is a winner or not. A great horn just sounds good to you ear and has that buzz and vibrates. When I find a winner, then I really put it through its paces. Subtone notes moving air, but playing as softly as possible to low Bb tells me about play condition and voicing of the horn. Then, I check flexability of tone and see if the horn can talk, I.E whether the horn has that lyrical quality. Tuning on most pro horns made in the last 50 years isn't really the issue unless you find a dog. Since there are so many schools of thought about the so called perfect horn, let's say I migrate more toward the Selmer sound rather than the large bore sound. You might play a 10m that really does it for you, and you wouldn't be wrong for choosing one. My point? Play whatever horn you can get your hands on, new or vintage, and if it sounds good and feels comfortable, don't worry about the name on the bell. Play the horn in person unless you deal with a straight shooter like Randy Jones.
I'm in agreement with you on this one...
 

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Response first. Ergonomics secondly. Manufacturing quality is a close second. B
 

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I choose overall response of the horn because I feel this is the key of buy some sax, the response, no matter manufacturer fame or brand. I heard bad Selmers, I heard good chinese saxes with excentrical names, I heard sublimes stencils or even Selmers, so, I think this is the main thing, the response of the horn, IMHO.
 
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