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Hello! Recently I watched a video on Bob Reynolds Virtual studio titled the "The Best Saxophone Mouthpiece in the World" to summarize he talks about how he sees many saxophonist always trying to chase after new gear ad buy new mouthpieces to try ad get the sound they want but i the end its all self practice and dedication to get the sound you want. Another point he brings up is when you try out a ew mouthpiece at first it might feel different but after a while you will sound the exact same. Bob believes any good quality jazz mouthpiece will get you the sound you have in you head. Bob says he has bee playing the same store bought Otto Link Tone Edge 9 for 15+ years. As may of you know in recent years Otto Link has has some quality control issues with their pieces however Bob has a great tone. So do ay of you agree with this statement? At first I did not agree but after buying so many mpcs and returning and selling them i can see that I ultimately sound the same and I just end up going back to my main mouthpiece. Do any of you agree? disagree? Why? Thanks!
 

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Bob Reynolds has been playing the same piece for 15 years because he found the one that worked for him. He had to try a lot of them to find a good one, as most of us do, unless we get lucky the very first time. So I understand the lesson to be: stop searching after you find something that works really well for you. I would tend to agree with that. But we should not interpret what Bob says as meaning that one should just stick with any mouthpiece and just work on tone production with it.
 

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Hello! Recently I watched a video on Bob Reynolds Virtual studio titled the "The Best Saxophone Mouthpiece in the World" to summarize he talks about how he sees many saxophonist always trying to chase after new gear ad buy new mouthpieces to try ad get the sound they want but i the end its all self practice and dedication to get the sound you want. Another point he brings up is when you try out a ew mouthpiece at first it might feel different but after a while you will sound the exact same. Bob believes any good quality jazz mouthpiece will get you the sound you have in you head. Bob says he has bee playing the same store bought Otto Link Tone Edge 9 for 15+ years. As may of you know in recent years Otto Link has has some quality control issues with their pieces however Bob has a great tone. So do ay of you agree with this statement? At first I did not agree but after buying so many mpcs and returning and selling them i can see that I ultimately sound the same and I just end up going back to my main mouthpiece. Do any of you agree? disagree? Why? Thanks!
Ok, here's my take. Bob was very lucky to find that piece and get on with it like he has. But a mouthpiece is a very personal thing. This whole discussion reminds me of a friend who started dating in high school, married the girl, had like 7-8 kids and is still married. To him, finding a wife and falling in love is easy peasy. He totally does not understand guys that date all these women and can never settle down. His advice is "Just pick one and marry her". It's not that easy for some people for personal reasons. They are on the search for a specific thing or a set of specific things. Some people are never happy with anyone. This comparison isn't perfect but it does have elements to consider.

Now, the advice to just pick any good quality jazz mouthpiece and you will sound like you isn't true at all. I loved Joshua Redman on his metal Link in the 90's. He sounds great on his HR Link but to me he sounds very different. I remember when Bob Mintzer played a metal piece way back and I really wasn't a fan of his tone. Next time I heard him on a Freddie Gregory I thought he sounded amazing. (also on the Navarro Bebop Special.....) I use to dig Bergonzi and Garzone a lot on metal Links (especially Garzone.....). They switched to HR Links and Jody Jazz and for me it didn't sound the same at all, still great but very different to my ears. I listen to some of my own mouthpiece clips and some I love to death and some I don't like that much. If they are all the same why do I have opinions about each of them good and bad.

Beyond the sound there is also the playability. I have played mouthpiece that everyone told me I sounded amazing on but I play a gig and I felt like there is a barrier. I feel stifled or handcuffed creatively for a reason I cannot even put into words. Other mouthpieces, I play and the floodgates are let loose. The other day I took out my Saxquest "The Core" and was playing in my garage and I felt like I was in complete heaven. It seemed like every thought I had just popped out of the horn effortlessly. Later I switched to another mouthpiece that played and sound just as great but for whatever reason there was a disconnection. I couldn't get it going. I have had gigs like that also. In my mind, the mouthpiece matters and is a huge element.

I will say that I think Bob is right in that I have had students that switch to other mouthpieces when I personally thought they sounded killer on the old mouthpiece. But it is a personal choice. I thought Joshua Redman should have stayed on that metal Link but he thought otherwise and that is fine. It's a personal journey and each person has to figure it out for themselves........
 

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.......also if Bob was unfortunate enough to drop his HR Link on a concrete floor and it shattered beyond repair, I bet replacing it would be a lot harder for him than just ordering another HR Otto Link 9 from WWBW for the next gig. I might be wrong, maybe it would be that easy but seeing Bob and Ben Wendel playing their VI's and SBA's and how conscious they were of how each horn sounded and responded makes me think that finding a replacement mouthpiece might not be a walk in the park..........
 

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I'm a long-term mouthpiece user but I will try others when the urge strikes. My current piece is going on 21 years and the one before that was 23 years. Before that there was some more rapid changing. He is correct about your 'voice' remaining the same through mouthpiece changes but depending on the mouthpiece it can have a different 'sound' - higher or lower partials predominate. For example, Dexter never sounded the same after he lost his early Conn/Dukoff set-up. You could tell it was him but it was different. It would be like a family member called you and had a cold or allergies - you could tell who it was but they sounded different. That's the best way I can describe mouthpiece changes.
That is completely ignoring the player's initial reaction to a different piece and how it plays, because the assumption is we have already gotten past those hurdles and are discussing mouthpieces that you are considering playing in public. When it gets that close, it frequently comes down to reed selection to fine-tune it to suit. Anytime you feel like you want more resistance to cut some 'buzz', you just use a more resistant reed. When you feel like you want a more lush sound, you use an easier reed. This is how we live with a good mouthpiece for a long time, because a good mouthpiece can do all that.
A seemingly trivial aspect of long-term mouthpiece use is simply maintenance and care. And its not trivial at all when you think about being able to play a great mouthpiece for the rest of your playing days. The most important thing is not dropping it. The next most important things are cleanliness and for a metal mouthpiece, removing the reed after use.
 

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Any good quality mouthpice may help you produce the sound that you have in your head. A Jazz mouthpiece is not a design but the mouthpiece that you use to play jazz ( which has to be one of the wittiest and truest thing someone told me many years ago on SOTW).

There are great chances that, despite the mouthpiece, one plays the way his ear/brain connection will tell him or her to play.

Incidentally, on a forum, aside from the classified adverts ( where the rules specifically prohibit discussing things like the price), every thread is a discussion, by definition.:whistle:
 

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IMHO, curiosity and ear-candy are the keywords in this discussion. I must admit I'm one of those guys Franky Lymon and the Teenagers have addressed. "Why do fools fall in love" (with mouthpieces). This certainly goes for me. As a limited player and late bloomer, I find joy and pleasure in playing, comparing and discriminating mouthpieces. Besides, it's a very good training for your ears. I love Nefertitis's site, and I have often been there (thanks a lot, Steve) sharing his great reviews.
Now here's another point: playing and listening to a lot of mouthpieces have taken me all the way to "my" best mouthpiece ever, an Otto Link NY Double Ring 5*. Had I not undertaken such a long road lined by mouthpieces, I would not have found it. So I'm very thankful.....and keep on comparing. My only rule: for every new mouthpiece another one has to go, and I'm trying to cover a broad range of sounds with the 5-7 mouthpieces I'm keeping.
 

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Bob believes any good quality jazz mouthpiece will get you the sound you have in you head.
Hard to disagree with this. Nothing wrong with a mouthpiece hunt for a particular horn, until of course it becomes an obsession. Marketers prey upon this and would have you believe all sorts of nonsense. But anyone who plays for long enough realizes the sound is within them, and they're going to sound the same on pretty much anything; even a different brand horn. I actually feel bad for folks that need to keep switching up their equipment to keep an interest in playing, or who fall prey to having to have the latest thing out there. None of that has anything to do with making music.
 

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Same topic, different title.

I think there are a lot of assumptions with Bob Reynold's anecdote, that the quality of his store-bought mouthpiece is the same as every other Link (and we know how highly variable Links are), how your sound concept does/should evolve is the same as process as his, or that the mouthpiece has no appreciable effect on playability.

I do agree that your holy grail can be a store-bought mouthpiece. I acquired some New York Meyers over the years (mainly to make money), and they all got sold because I think my $75 Meyer from 20+ years back sounds better or the same.

Also, being a Link junkie I found my holy grail, but still am on the lookout... not that I'd find a better one, but because it's fun to experience the different nuances they have. The Link that I keep going back to (aside from my 7* No USA STM) is a $150 New Vintage Link I found in the store.

Another much-belabored point is that someone can sound the same in the playback recording, but to the player's ear it's very different. With my favorite mouthpiece I actually am not that happy when I hear it back, but love the sound when I'm playing.
 

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Hello! Recently I watched a video on Bob Reynolds Virtual studio titled the "The Best Saxophone Mouthpiece in the World" to summarize he talks about how he sees many saxophonist always trying to chase after new gear ad buy new mouthpieces to try ad get the sound they want but i the end its all self practice and dedication to get the sound you want. Another point he brings up is when you try out a ew mouthpiece at first it might feel different but after a while you will sound the exact same. Bob believes any good quality jazz mouthpiece will get you the sound you have in you head. Bob says he has bee playing the same store bought Otto Link Tone Edge 9 for 15+ years. As may of you know in recent years Otto Link has has some quality control issues with their pieces however Bob has a great tone. So do ay of you agree with this statement? At first I did not agree but after buying so many mpcs and returning and selling them i can see that I ultimately sound the same and I just end up going back to my main mouthpiece. Do any of you agree? d. isagree? Why? Thanks!
Agree. Concept is the most valuable piece of 'gear' you will ever need. I love all my equipment to be in perfect working order but I've heard enough players who can play circles around me do unbelievable things on far less than perfect equipment. Is it nice to know that what you are using is free from defects or at least in good working order? Of course! But it's not necessary for most of us.

There was an anecdote posted a few years back about JP Rampal and his gold Haynes flute. So many at the time in his circle believed that was the source of that marvelous tone he had. When many got the chance to play it, they found it was stuffy and hard to center the pitch for them. Rampal transcended his gear in that instance. My first teacher was a Bordeaux grad and when his horn fell the day before a recital, Londeix loaned my teacher his personal instrument. When he played Londeix's alto, he couldn't believe how 'out of tune' the open C# was slotting. He complained and Londeix told him, "I'm sorry but YOU are out of tune".
 
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