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Discussion Starter #1
Trumpet players, I covet your advice. I have an ongoing itch to play trumpet, but being a novice, what sort of trumpet should I be looking to buy? Mouthpiece; what sort?

Should I buy the best I can offord or a secondhand outfit?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Why not BOTH!
Check around for a pre-owned 'intermediate/pro' level and compare the asking prices to those of a new 'student/intermediate' trumpet.

Anything Yamaha is going to be good. The newer Bach Strads just ain't what they used to be.
My youngest plays a Yamaha Allegro. NICE trumpet.
For marching band I got her a King student horn. Nice player, but didn't have Monel valves and showed a little more wear than she liked, but hey, it got her through 4 years on the field with no issues.
Getson is good, Blessing are hit and miss, Jupiter makes a good student trumpet. Older Olds and Conn trumpets are pretty good, solid horns as well. Bundy.... Eh, It's a trumpet.

Most trumpet teachers will tell you that a 5C is a good middle of the road mpc to start with. Cup size in trumpet is different than bra's. A cup is bigger than a D cup. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Fantastic!

Thanks bandmommy, I'll probably look into getting an Allegro, but Getson might be a consideration if I see one around.

Question; should I be aware of mouthpiece choice at this stage, and if so, what should I be looking out for?
 

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The Trumpet Gearhead is a well done site answering just your questions. http://www.dallasmusic.org/gearhead/

Good reccomendations on the trumpets from BM. I especially like the Olds Ambassadors (stick to the sixties and earlier- sn 660000 is probably about as high as I'd go). Very nice horns- I have several trumpets including the usual fairly pricey suspects but also keep an Ambassador simply because it plays really well. You can find them very cheap on EBay in good condition. Ask specifically about red rot inside the horn- unlike sax's where it's primarily a cosmetic issue trumpets can be "et up."

I'd stick with the standard 7c size on the mouthpiece- it's the standard starter size for every major manufacturer; and trumpet mouthpieces after the basics are as all over the map as sax mouthpieces. Some go smaller and shallower, some go for miniature soup plates- it all depends on the individual concept of sound and where you're headed. If the horn you get doesn't come with one I have a boxful and would be glad to mail you one. Leave the 5c (if you go the Bach route- and the 5c is the standard step up size for school programs) for later, after you've a comfortable mastery of the basic range (G through C above the staff) .
 

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You can also send our member gary a PM. He's a trumpet player. I'll bet he'd be more than happy to help you.
Just be sure to say thank you. :)
 

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Hey Henry,
I have an Olds Ambassador cornet. It's an early/mid 70s' but it sounds better than some of the stuff out there today. :)
 

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The Trumpet Gearhead is a well done site answering just your questions. http://www.dallasmusic.org/gearhead/

Good reccomendations on the trumpets from BM. I especially like the Olds Ambassadors (stick to the sixties and earlier- sn 660000 is probably about as high as I'd go). Very nice horns- I have several trumpets including the usual fairly pricey suspects but also keep an Ambassador simply because it plays really well. You can find them very cheap on EBay in good condition. Ask specifically about red rot inside the horn- unlike sax's where it's primarily a cosmetic issue trumpets can be "et up."

I'd stick with the standard 7c size on the mouthpiece- it's the standard starter size for every major manufacturer; and trumpet mouthpieces after the basics are as all over the map as sax mouthpieces. Some go smaller and shallower, some go for miniature soup plates- it all depends on the individual concept of sound and where you're headed. If the horn you get doesn't come with one I have a boxful and would be glad to mail you one. Leave the 5c (if you go the Bach route- and the 5c is the standard step up size for school programs) for later, after you've a comfortable mastery of the basic range (G through C above the staff) .
+1 on the Olds ambassadors!!!! Free blowing with a solid core to the sound.....Good intonation and valves on the old ones. They are tanks.

My section-mate has a bunch of horns including a Schilke, and a couple of Harrilsons.....When it just has to get done, out comes the Olds Ambassador! I've got an Ambassador tenor trombone that works well too. I agree with the Bach 7C for a first mouthpiece. It might end up being the only mouthpiece you really ever need.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The Trumpet Gearhead is a well done site answering just your questions. http://www.dallasmusic.org/gearhead/

Good reccomendations on the trumpets from BM. I especially like the Olds Ambassadors (stick to the sixties and earlier- sn 660000 is probably about as high as I'd go). Very nice horns- I have several trumpets including the usual fairly pricey suspects but also keep an Ambassador simply because it plays really well. You can find them very cheap on EBay in good condition. Ask specifically about red rot inside the horn- unlike sax's where it's primarily a cosmetic issue trumpets can be "et up."

I'd stick with the standard 7c size on the mouthpiece- it's the standard starter size for every major manufacturer; and trumpet mouthpieces after the basics are as all over the map as sax mouthpieces. Some go smaller and shallower, some go for miniature soup plates- it all depends on the individual concept of sound and where you're headed. If the horn you get doesn't come with one I have a boxful and would be glad to mail you one. Leave the 5c (if you go the Bach route- and the 5c is the standard step up size for school programs) for later, after you've a comfortable mastery of the basic range (G through C above the staff) .
Very much appreciated
 

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I have no personal experience with them. They don't seem to have much of a reputation either way. I'd expect them to be pretty generic but probably reasonably constructed horns. Unless it was a real deal I'd think you could probably do better though.

http://www.brassreview.com/reviews/index.php?cat=2 is a ... well a Brass Review site- just like the name suggests. Of some use- though I'd take the reviews with a grain of salt.

Buy a copy of Arban's. It has been the bible for trumpet players for going on a century. You can get a 100 year old copy on EBay or a brand new "Platinum Edition" on Amazon- or pretty much anything in between. After the latest editing (in the twenties) they all have the same studies and text- it's just a question of "aura" ( how yellow the pages are and how many penciled in notations there are from students who are now long since dead).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Henry D, I edited out my B&H question because I'd read a review on the exact horn I saw advertised in the meantime. It was not a good review.

At this point, I think I'll just got with an Allegro, or perhaps itrack down an Olds Ambassador here in AU.
 

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I agree with the posts recommending the Ambassador. The Olds Ambassador is a good bet and will hold its value. It has a different blow compared to other trumpets. It is often described as "slotting". That is the horn seems to want to slot each note and will resist sliding from pitch to pitch. Some players like it and others don't but I think it's helpful for a saxophonist starting on trumpet. The opposite type of horn is a Conn, especially one will leaky valves like many of the later student models.

You can easily recognize earlier and more desirable Ambassadors by the round pinky rest on top of leader pipe. Later one are open like most trumpets. A few photos from one of the recommended websites will show you what I mean. These horns will hold their value. But later ones are also good players. Watch out for worn out valves. Check for leaks!

Other horns that are good and cheap are the Reynolds horns made in Fullerton, CA. Avoid the other vintages unless you have some experience. And, if you don't have issues playing a cornet instead a trumpet, you will find many cheap good horns from vintage to modern. Kids don't seem to want cornet as much as older plays do.

The 7C is good, but don't be afraid to try a lot of different mouthpieces as well. Try to find a local store with a lot of used junk in back. You never know what you will find. Our chops are all different and you might find something other than the 7C will suit you better. Often players will want a deeper cup -- less range but easier blow.

Best advice of all, find a good teacher! You might even be able to trade sax lessons for trumpet lessons.
 

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At this point, I think I'll just got with an Allegro, or perhaps itrack down an Olds Ambassador here in AU.
Geez man, while I was digging around for some good opportunities for you, you already made up your mind? In three hours of asking your question? What's that all about? Doesn't seem like you were very serious about getting advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Geez man, while I was digging around for some good opportunities for you, you already made up your mind? In three hours of asking your question? What's that all about? Doesn't seem like you were very serious about getting advice.
What? How did I know you were going to pipe up? By all means please post your information. Every bit helps and is mucho appreciato as I haven't made my mind up, simply taking onboard the best of what was suggested so far.

Edit; I think I've been trolled
 

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Another thumbs up for the Olds Ambassador. I just bought one for my school and am really impressed. ThreeSixTwoFive has it right about the "slotting" of certain trumpets. Unless you are pretty advanced you want something like a Yamaha or an Olds.
 

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I started on a junker Yamaha student model that I bought for $25 at a garage sale. It wasn't pretty but it worked and sounded good. I loved it!

As far as what you should get, you should figure out what your goals are. If you just want something to learn and blow on, then get a cheapo student model. It will take you a long way. If you decide to stick with it, then you can think about getting a better horn.

The main thing with beginning trumpet is you gotta make sure the valves move freely. And once you've determined there's nothing blocking up the tubing, then you're pretty much good to go. Not like sax where a single leaky pad can mess everything up.

For a mp, get a Bach 7C. That's what most beginners start on.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Good advice everybody (except gary)

I've been checking out used Yamaha's and trying to find Olds Ambassadors here, but so far - none. Looks like I'll get a Yamaha.
Listening to ABC Jazz here and everytime I hear a trumpet being played, I am so impressed with how soulful they can sound. I love trumpet.
 

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Should work just fine.

On the mouthpiece; the Bach 7c has been the mouthpiece size for starting out for a long long time. The Yamaha equivalent size is 11- and Yamaha makes perfectly good mouthpieces. There isn't the plastic vice hard rubber vice metal issue associated with student sax mouthpieces, (though there are, as you get into trumpet mouthpieces later, plenty of things to obsess about...).

If the trumpet you wind up with comes with a Yamaha 11 in good shape there's no reason whatsoever not to use it.

FWIW the Bach system gets bigger as the numbers get smaller; 7C (C being cup depth) as the start with 1 being large and intended primarily for symphonic players with well developed embouchures and 14 being the small size for Maynard Ferguson wannabe's.

Schilke (and Yamaha- though Yamaha runs a tiny bit smaller in the sizing of the larger pieces) get smaller as the numbers get smaller and larger as the numbers get ... I'm primarily a Schilke user myself- used to use 18's but as I've gotten older and my lips have collapsed I've scaled back to 14's.

Again- I'd master the full range on the basic 7c or 11 before I went moving on to other sizes.

Good luck.
 
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