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Hi everybody. I am currently searching for a used,reasonably priced fox bassoon. I'm only interested in wooden ones with a high D key. Other than that, I open for any,and all suggestions. Oh, and happy bassooning.


Musically,
ally:)
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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"Reasonable priced" and "Fox bassoon" seem a contradiction in terms. I used to play a Fox bassoon in college. Had I bought a roomful of them then, I could buy a house by selling them now.

Check also sneezy.org and look in the link of archives. There you will find two discussion forums "Bassoon" and "Double Reed".

Good luck!
 

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The perpetual quandrary

With an instrument like the bassoon, any that are "good" (in the relative sense of the term) are likely to be spoken for before they go on sale. You may occasionally come up with a "good" instrument (rather than an average one), but it's going to be a matter of pot luck if you blunder into it.

The fact that you posted on here indicates to me that bassoon playing is not your primary interest. Unless you play a lot and have the chops to make it work for you, a "good" bassoon is going to be price overkill. It's not that you wouldn't appreciate it, just that it's going to be many orders of magnitude harder to find that "good" horn in a sea of average and student ones.

If I had my druthers, I'd opt for a polypropylene instrument, simply because it's many times more stable and immune to wood issues that will be present with a wood instrument. (It would help with the price a bit, but not much.) If nothing else, a plastic horn will have fewer potential abuse issues, simply because of the body materials.

And, I'd set my mind at being ready to pay in the neighborhood of $5,000 for that "good" instrument (and maybe not finding one at that price). Push comes to shove, you are purchasing a horn that involves more in the way of finishing than does a clarinet or saxophone. Work equals labor costs, and labor costs equal a higher price.

As for specifying which optional keywork you'd like to have, every such addition to the specification makes it that much harder to find something that will fit the bill. Nothing wrong with having a row of keys there that look like the buttons on one of Marlene Dietrich's long slinky dresses, but the more customized the arrangement, the fewer there will be to pick from in the final analysis.

This would all be simple if only you would agree to take up the harmonica...
 

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Pardon My French said:
Hi everybody. I am currently searching for a used,reasonably priced fox bassoon. I'm only interested in wooden ones with a high D key.
Well, when you say "reasonably priced" and "Fox wooden bassoon" in the same sentence, you mean "reasonable" for a Fox wooden bassoon, which is several thousand dollars. No way are you going to find that elusive bargain horn that we sax players are always looking for at garage sales and pawn shops.

My thought is to look at eBay. They usually have quite a number of bassoons for sale. But again, be prepared to offer up some healthy coin.

My bassoon is a wooden Kohlert. It's a student horn, but it suits my doubling needs just fine--I love it! I got it for $400 through the Want Ad Press, a weekly publication you can find in convenience stores (this rag was the place to go for good used horns in the pre-eBay days; it still sells plenty of horns). If there is no concrete reason why you must have a Fox, there are plenty of other good bassoons out there for the "reasonable" price it sounds like you're looking for.
 

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Pardon My French said:
Hi everybody. I am currently searching for a used,reasonably priced fox bassoon. I'm only interested in wooden ones with a high D key. Other than that, I open for any,and all suggestions. Oh, and happy bassooning.


Musically,
ally:)
Make sure that if you are going to buy a Fox that you get at least the 220 model or better. The 222D will technically fit your description (wood, high D) but it is still primarily a student bassoon with student bocals.

The CVX bocals that are included with the 220 and 240 models are quite good and these instruments are phenomenal.

The 220 is probably better for most high school/regular college players as its intonation is more stable for them.

The 240 is better for the lead player that can control the intonation themselves. The 240 bore will produce a richer warmer Heckel style sound, but its downside is the intonation is less precise.

Currently, I have none in stock but have all models mentioned on order.

-Dave Kessler
 

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Dunno if you're still looking for that bassoon,
but I've had a lot of luck on ebay.
As other members have said on this thread, "reasonably priced" for a used Fox bassoon is over $2000. However, you may get a polypropylene instrument for considerably less. I got my 222 for $2300 on ebay, and it is actually a comparable sounding instrument than my repairman's $18,000 schreiber. The high D key is going to complicate things price-wise. You don't need a high D key to play high D easily. or E or F for that matter, so it would increase your options if you forgot about that (unless you have other reasons for wanting a high D key? trills?). Fox is also not the only good bassoon brand around. There are comarable (some say better, too) brands like Moennig, Schreiber, Moosmann (I think better than fox), and Polisi too, all of which I have tested examples of, and all of which are exellent. Cheap Heckels sometimes crop up to (we're talking like $6,000! for a heckel!)
Don't know if that helps, but I hope it does.
 
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