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So I'm working on this 51xxx conn soprano. For some reason the horn has a coat of clear lacquer over the silver plating. A lot of it has came off, but some didn't and I burnt it while trying to resolder a post. It turned yellow and then black once it touched the flame, which is weird by itself. I thought lacquer should have some basic heat resistance but apparently this one doesn't. Now there is a big patch of burnt lacquer on the horn and I can't get it off. The horn also has tiny spots of lacquer that can't be wiped off and makes the horn looks really bad on the outside. Any recommendations on ways to remove it or good chemical stripping material?
 

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Someone at some stage has gotten sick of the tarnished look and coated it, to remove the lacquer a hot hot bath, around 60degrees Celsius, will do it.

Removing burnt finish requires buffing.

Steve
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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Because of the silver plating I would be reluctant to use any kind of abrasive on it. I would wash it in hot water first and if the burnt areas don't come off, use lacquer thinner - wearing Nitrile gloves and using it outdoors, wet a terry cloth with it and rub the lacquer off. If you still have a residual stain, use silver polish on it. This will give you brighter areas assuming you have a matte finish but there's really not much else to do. You could polish the whole thing by hand.
BTW, washing a sax with the springs in it, be sure to blow it dry as soon as you can, then use a penetrant on the springs, being sure to let some creep into the post with the spring. This will displace any moisture and prevent corrosion. If you leave any screws or rods in it, do the same with them especially at the threads.
You could omit the water wash if you use lacquer thinner on the whole thing, but be advised if it has needle springs in it, you are going to get stuck many times.
 

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I also find that very fine grade steel wool soaked with oil will remove the unwanted burn also.
Buffing is simply a super fine abrasive, steel wool is also an abrasive, the goal is just to find the abrasive that does the job and leaves minimal visual evidence of having been done
 
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