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Future Music Educator
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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Selmer LaVoix tenor and I've noticed that if I try to play G1 quiet without manipulating my throat from A to G I get a burble, like I have a leak...but if I make it a desperate attempt to open up my throat all the way up I can do the G all the way down quiet. Is this common in tenor?

I'm using an S80 C* mouthpiece if this matters at all. Thanks! :cool:
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member
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JP: Many problems can involve poor embouchure. But once a player is established, I believe problems are mostly mechanical (leaks either from faulty pads or interconnected mechanisms that are either opening or closing or NOT doing that, inappropriately). I recently took up a tenor after 49 years of soprano, alto and clarinet. The problem you describe is not one of mine on tenor.

Many mechanical problems can be blown through, but the very fact that you have to make adjustments tells me it may be a leak somewhere. DAVE
 

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Future Music Educator
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Discussion Starter #3
How do I check for a leak besides using a flashlight and seeing if light is seeping through? (The horn passed this test with flying colors)
 

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Future Music Educator
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Discussion Starter #4
And PS...this ONLY happens when I play at like a pp or ppp level <_<
 

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Future Music Educator
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Discussion Starter #7
Pretty sure it's not :(
 

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JP: Many of us have leak-lights. I don't know if that is for you, but they can be purchased (or made, I suppose). A flashlight will not likely identify small leaks.

But other than leaky pads, the check of your mechanisms is easy to do. It takes patience and a sharp eye. Sit down with your horn and work ALL of the keys, top to bottom. Look for ever-so-slight movements when they shouldn't happen (e.g., the raising of the G# pad when it is supposed to be tightly closed; the failure of the bisBb to close when you play either forked Bb fingering; the slight movement of the upper octave key when you finger G2 down to D2; etc., etc.). Those things are often overlooked by inexperienced players (not that you are or aren't - I don't know) and even some repair-techs. DAVE
 

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Future Music Educator
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Discussion Starter #9
Dave,

I've been watching horns work for about seven years, so I'm no repair man or techie, but not inexperienced.

I might have found the problem (mechanism), but will have to further inspect it to be sure :D
 

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JP: I suspected you may be more than a novice, but one can't be sure on SOTW where some posters talk a big deal but aren't. But even the more experienced players often times fog-over when faced with anything mechanical. Heck, it takes me three nails to drive one straight!! DAVE
 

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Future Music Educator
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Discussion Starter #11
That's funny Dave...lol.

I might even have a techie look over this horn just in case...I might miss something as a non-repairman.

Thanks for all the help!
 

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Future Music Educator
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Discussion Starter #12
Well,

My director and I did some talking today and it turns out that this is a common note problem on tenor. The G note is especially finicky if you don't have it just right...I found if I opened up my throat a bit more and if I tightened up my bottom lip a hair, I could play at a ppp level rather comfortably.

Thanks for all the help guys!!
 
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