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Discussion Starter #1
Hi!

Would a bench motor of 3000rpm work well when buffing or will the speed be too fast?
Will 3000rpm be too much when straigtening a rod? (I've used several other tools that are much slower but a bit too slow to work with IMHO)

Thank you!
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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It is the peripheral speed that matters. It should be roughly 7500 feet per minute.

So if your motor is 3000 rpm, using this table - http://www.schaffnermfg.com/engineers-speedchart/ - you would need a 10" buff to achieve the 7500 feet per minute surface speed. I doubt a bench motor has enough HP to operate a 10" mop. If you want to operate say a 6" mop then you really need a motor speed of 3000 x 10/6, i.e. 5000 rpm. Or for a 4" mop, 3000 x 10/4 = 7500 rpm. (My 1" mops turn at around 30,000 rpm in my dental micromotor.)

Machine buffs typically have a somewhat specialised design of motor that is very weak at less than it's specified speed but extra strong at its specified speed.
It is also specialized in that it is totally enclosed so that abrasive does not get into the bearings and motor - hence no fan cooling.
Because all cooling is by conduction through the casing, there is an issue with heat build-up, hence motor burning out, sok the motor is designed to be extra efficient to produce less heat, and is also likely to have a superior insulation on the windings that can stand more heat without burning.
Machine buffs also have an extended, narrowed housing for the bearings, and a extra thick, rigid shaft extending well beyond that, such that the machine physically intrudes as little as possible into the space the operator needs around the mop to manipulate the work.

All this costs money!
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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Thanks, JfW, for letting me know that the link in my last post was incorrect. I have now corrected it. :)
 
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