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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello fellow sax plyrs! I have been playing a Yamaha YTS62 (original, not purple logo), since 1998. If you had said to me, that the make of your horn makes a difference in your sound, I would have been skeptical. However, recently a fellow sax player (retired) said he had a horn for me to try out. I took home a very nice Buffet Super Dynaction Tenor Sax, serial number 6***. Well....let's just say, I didn't give it back, and got a wicked deal on it! I ADORE this horn very much!!! That sound, wow! But when I look for information on these horns, all I can really find is a repairman's overview. I'm curious to know what it is made of (as it's so heavy); why the super dynaction logo is engraved differently on the horns; any other interesting info. All I can deduce, is the horn is from 1958 - by the serial number. I have attached a photo - I think it is the original lacquer as well (beauty!). I did have it fully repadded. PhotoGrid_1560699461993.jpg

Anyone out there have any insight into how these horns are made? I'm just super curious!!

My set up is as follows: For big band music I use a Jody Jazz HR 6*, with D'Addario H ligature, and Vandoren Java Red 3. For rock/blues music I use a Jody Jazz Giant 7*, with Rovner dark ligature, and Vandoren Java Red 2 1/2. *I'm looking to switch up the ligs
 

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Congratulations on your acquisition, SDAs are indeed wonderful horns! I haven't tried too many that have a tone that grabs me as much - Martin Committee, Conn 10M, King Zephyr - certainly none of the Yamahas or the Taiwanese brands.

In principle the body is just sheets of brass that were formed on a variety of mandrels, just like every other sax. As for certain unique details, Matt Stohrer's overview is really one of the best treatments you'll find. Dig down into the threads in this section of the forum (like the one I started when I was about to buy mine) and you'll find a fair amount of interesting stuff.

The engraving on yours is pretty much identical to mine (which was about twelve years later than yours), the most noticable difference being the font of the model name. I have no clue why the change, unless it's that they were all cut by hand. Play it in good health.
 

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I've recently acquired a 1972 SDA tenor. I was a solidly converted Martin player but this horn has won me over.
https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/...TtYOm10cTQ6mnR1t_f?tab=io&sort=13&direction=a

Mr. Stoher is correct in his discussion of the bell keys. Along with tweaking the bell key springs, I swapped out the shrink wrap tubing on the connecting "nubs" on the low C# and the octave mechanism with Teflon tubing (Ferree's size for Selmer 8va key). That removed some annoying play in the keys and it's slick!

Great horns, indeed.
 

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I swapped out the shrink wrap tubing on the connecting "nubs" on the low C# and the octave mechanism with Teflon tubing (Ferree's size for Selmer 8va key). That removed some annoying play in the keys and it's slick!
Was that the one they call "O38 Sax Octave Key Lever Tubing"? I want to do the same thing.
 

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Was that the one they call "O38 Sax Octave Key Lever Tubing"? I want to do the same thing.
I've had the stuff in my repair kit for a very long time. Unfortunately, I don't have the original packing but from what I can tell, I think that is the same stuff. The tubing will stretch a little. I had to force it on a bit but it does fit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info!! I will check out your thread! I was curious as to why the logos were different... I'm in agreement, that it must be because they were by hand. I've seen a couple of variations. Was wondering what material was used to make the horn as well... super heavy.

Will browse the forum to see if I can find any interesting info. My fav horn to play, by far!! It does have it's quirks on some of the notes though - which I would expect of any of the vintage horns.

Cheers!
 

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My '72 is a phenomenal funk/rock horn. The thing freakin' screams like a mother. I have yet to push it too far, and love the ease of the overtones.

It is a heavy freakin' horn. Love it to death - it has definately taken play time from my '68 VI (which is actually darker than the SDA).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
@GoatTndr ...I had no idea about this horn. Was given it to try from a fellow sax player (older gent). I never gave it back. I think b/c he knew it was going to someone that was going to luv it & play it regularly.. i got it for a very affordable price - which helped w/ the cost of getting it repadded. So you just never know! 😊
 

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@GoatTndr ...I had no idea about this horn. Was given it to try from a fellow sax player (older gent). I never gave it back. I think b/c he knew it was going to someone that was going to luv it & play it regularly.. i got it for a very affordable price - which helped w/ the cost of getting it repadded. So you just never know! 😊
Lucky break for you. Many tenors ago, I had a good SDA. I sold it back then to try some other tenors. Now I know I could have saved myself a lot of trouble and expense and just kept it! Such is the journey...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Agreed! If u find the right horn, u will buy it regardless.

Playing sax is all about feeling. It's an extension of expression. If u get a chance to try/purchase a horn u would rarely play. Even if u dont play a lot. U will find one u will adore & have a connection with.
...then it will spur u on, to want to play more.
 
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