Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,093 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to find out about the transparent-bodied Bb clarinet that Buffet made in small numbers in the late 1980s. It had copper plated keys and according to an old advert I have from March 1989 "an amazing sound. Limited supplies at £260". I suppose that would be about £500 or $1,000 in today's money.

Does anyone have any more information on this clarinet, like:
  • What Buffet model was it ?
  • What does it sound like ?
  • How many were made ?
  • What was the idea ?

I am interested in strange-bodied saxes and clarinets and would like to buy/trade for one of these Buffets if there are any available.

Rhys

PS Also saw a previous thread with reference to this clear-bodied oboe: http://www.marigaux.com/english/instruments/zoom/pic/zoom_2001_altuglass.jpg
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
3,112 Posts
They were a special edition B12 but in clear perspex and copper plated keys and fittings, and at £260 back in 1989 that was slightly less than the RRP of a standard B12 which was £279 back then (how's that for remembering nuggets of trivia?)

There was one on eBay recently, and in pretty good condition.

I wish I bought one at the time! They had them in Howarth's Brighton shop back then, and the Vito 'Dazzler' clarinets in all manner of colours (and much better than those cheapo Chinese things being sold on eBay that will only last 6 months at the most, though much longer in landfill sites when chucked out with the rest of the household waste).

If you like the clear Marigaux oboe, you should see the Marigaux 930 cor in aultglass!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
Sprog#1 has one - it's a B12 and plays just fine - if you want a weird task just try getting a replacement cost estimate for insurance purposes.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW member, musician, technician &
Joined
·
5,031 Posts
Like others wrote it is the B12 model and Giora Feidman plays one of those sometimes. One time he explained the main difference between the transparent one and the regular clarinets. With the transparent one everyone can see if you play the wrong note! :D ;)
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
They must have looked pretty gross once there was some build-up of dirtied mineral deposits (and pull-through fluff/) in the bore and especially in the bottom of tone holes. And how elegant does the visible greased cork (and greasy deposits) look?

Not for me!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,093 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the replies and information.

Gordon (NZ) said:
They must have looked pretty gross once there was some build-up of dirtied mineral deposits (and pull-through fluff/) in the bore and especially in the bottom of tone holes. And how elegant does the visible greased cork (and greasy deposits) look?
Do people with experience of the Perspex Buffet find that this is true ?

I like the idea of a transparent clarinet with my Brilhart tonalite (transparent) mouthpiece and maybe a Bari plastic reed to top it off !

Rhys
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
3,112 Posts
They came with a transparent mouthpiece that was the same spec as the B12 mouthpiece, though a crystal one would be infinitely better. I used to use a Bari plastic reed with my Vandoren A1 crystal, and with a clear Luyben ligature - but not on a clear plastic clarinet.

I'd assume as the players were able to see the condition of the bore, they'd be more wise to keeping it as clean as possible. So not advised for players that neglect their instruments. Shame they don't make clear perspex saxes - that'd make people clean the buggers out rather than leaving them to go all skanky.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2011
Joined
·
1,033 Posts
Apparently the best ones were made from melted down Spitfire canopies from WWII...
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
3,112 Posts
How can they make a transparent E11 when the E11 is a wooden clarinet (and pretty much a wooden-bodied version of the B12)?

I generally take eBay descriptions with a pinch of salt.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2010, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,076 Posts
Chris Peryagh said:
How can they make a transparent E11 when the E11 is a wooden clarinet (and pretty much a wooden-bodied version of the B12)?

I generally take eBay descriptions with a pinch of salt.
Aren't transparent axes immune to telekinetic repair? Is that a problem?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
1,385 Posts
Chris Peryagh said:
How can they make a transparent E11 when the E11 is a wooden clarinet (and pretty much a wooden-bodied version of the B12)?

I generally take eBay descriptions with a pinch of salt.
A good question, and one asked of the seller, who posted an extra picture in response:





I thought it was interesting myself, which is why I archived the auction.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
3,112 Posts
Weird - they were marketed as a limited edition B12 when I were a lad, and sold for the same price (£279).

Though I do like the way the pillar threads, toneholes and speaker bush show through the body.

As perspex is a molecular substance I'm sure telekinesis will work on it.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2010, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,076 Posts
Chris Peryagh said:
Weird - they were marketed as a limited edition B12 when I were a lad, and sold for the same price (£279).

Though I do like the way the pillar threads, toneholes and speaker bush show through the body.

As perspex is a molecular substance I'm sure telekinesis will work on it.
But I think the telekinetic force is light-based. . . .
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
3,112 Posts
potiphar said:
Apparently the best ones were made from melted down Spitfire canopies from WWII...
Weren't Messerschmidt canopies good enough?

I'd have thought Schreiber would have sourced German raw materials for making their clarinets from!
 

·
Forum Contributor 2010, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,076 Posts
Chris Peryagh said:
Weren't Messerschmidt canopies good enough?

Those were definitely immune to telekinesis. The Allieds tried using psychics against the Nazis (they were hidden in underground bunkers in London) to no effect. Surely this is evidence in favor of my point.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
3,112 Posts
Reedsplinter said:
But I think the telekinetic force is light-based. . . .
It'll work once the bore is opaque with a light coating of condensation in that case, so it's best to do any telekinetic work on it after about 30 seconds of playing in the cold.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top