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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey there, first off, I just want to say this is the first time I've posted here, and these forums are really great. So, onto my real topic, I'm bidding on this saxophone, http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=120680204123&ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT#ht_500wt_1156

The saxophone is a buffet-crampon saxophone, and from what I've seen around the web, this is from circa 1890. I have never played on a saxophone from before 1960, as I am just a student in high school. I have however played on a buescher 400, so my question is, how similar are these older models to newer models? For example, will these older saxophones be more fragile and prone to breakage? Or will their age effect the sound. My parents are pretty skeptical about older items, so I would need to explain how the older sax would not be a huge burden, unless it is. Could someone please tell me the major differences between these 80-100 year old saxophones, and the newer 20-modern saxes. Finally, about how much would this cost to be refurbished so it would work well enough?

Also, on a last note, would this sax be playable in a marching band? I ask as I would like to play a good sax for that but also not have it break down at the first sights of the outside.
 

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For starters, that sax is absolutely not from the late 1800's. I'm not much of a Buffet guy, but I believe that sax was made during the 60's. Since it's an Evette (I believe Malerne made some of these if I'm not mistaken), the serial numbers are not comparable to Buffet serial numbers.

If it was indeed over a hundred years old, it would be keyed only to low B and have other quirks such as separate octave keys.

Barring any seized screws and/or rods, or any excessive key play, the cost to overhaul them is similar to any modern sax. And it would work just fine in any modern setting.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks vintage, I was just looking at the serial number list and I couldn't find an evette schaeffer serial # list. So, the sax would play fine in a marching band setting? I know most saxes wouldn't accept the cold or heat very well. Do you know of anyone who can compare this sax to some other options I've seen? I'm not good at distinguishing between the different models so I would like to know the general consensus on saxes such as this one, http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...857305&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT#ht_2829wt_905, or this one, http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...670001&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT#ht_500wt_1156.

I also realized this should probably be in the beginners forum for advice on buying a saxophone, so if someone could move this that would be great.
 

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Buffet-Crampon saxophone serial number list is devoted to professional instruments only. This Evette-Schaffer is probably from the '60s and is considered an intermediate model.
Can be a good buy depending on the final price.
Jovi
 

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Ironically, that Buescher you are looking at also has been dated incorrectly. In '23, Buescher was producing the True Tone models (which that is not). That tenor is a second line horn, so Buescher serial numbers can't be used to date it. Just in regard to this sax, I find that the seller occasionally marks instruments incorrectly (as in this case) and their prices are on the inflated side of things. Although an Elkhart is a well built sax that would perform just fine in a marching setting.

In regards to a sax that can handle cold weather, all of them fair the same (more or less). The issue with cold is more in relation to things such as shellac becoming brittle. So no matter which sax you buy, all will essentially have the same potential problems in extreme temperatures.

All the saxes you listed would be suitable for marching band (although I would hesitate to use such a nice Couf as a marching horn). The differences between them would be their individual timbre and ergonomics. But this is a personal preference, and it takes a player trying out horns to find the one that they like the best.

Are you looking for a sax for all your playing, or just for marching band? Marching any sax is hell on the instrument. It's easy to get bent rods, dents, and possibly seized rods/screws (if you're outside enough times when it's raining). If at all possible, it's generally advised to have a sax just for marching (if you're going to be doing much of it).

A few other relatively inexpensive vintage tenors to consider would be:
a Martin Indiana, a Pan American (with LH bell keys), a late Buescher 400, or an early Conn 16M Director. But these are just a handful of options, there are other saxes out there that would do the job well.

A Yamaha YTS-23 (or similar Vito) is a good modern choice. And although it's hard to find one as cheaply as the saxes above, Cannonball saxes are practically meant for marching. I don't like them in any other setting, but they can be very loud...which is a nice thing when you're competing with high brass.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks vintage, so the superb is a good sax? I was looking at that for another sax if my bid on the buffet fell through. I have the student model Yamaha, which I think is the YTS-23, although I may be mistaken. To your other question, I am looking for a sax for all around purpose, not just marching band as that is only in the fall at my school. The Buescher I listed, the 400, is that the same model as the one you suggested? I could get that, and I've had experience playing a Buescher 400 from around 1930, but would the couf be a better sax all around?
 

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Get a Dynaction or Super Dynaction (SDA) and you will see that it is very versatile horn - whether you play marching music or otherwise.
 

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that Evette is not a "normal" Evette. It looks like the tenor I had that i think was a Marlern Stencil. Normally Evettes are engraved with embroidered looking letters and this one is single deep cuts.
 

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That is an Evette & Schaeffer-stenciled Malerne -- it's from the 50s. I have one a lot like it. Looks like the auction ended a whlie ago.

As for the original poster, unless you're looking for something different and unique, get a YTS-23. They're solid, reliable and consistent. The ergo's on these old Malernes are a bit funky compared to modern horns. I have a hard time getting to C# and B. You'll have an easier time with the Yamaha.
 

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I am trying to figure out what I have here. It's definitely a Buffet/Crampon, however the bell logo stuff makes little sense to me -- these characters don't even seem to be letters or numbers!

Any help?
 
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