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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wondering if anyone has experience with different variations of true tone sopranos. From pictures I can see that the G# key changed at some point in the mid 20s from a typewriter style key to a roller. The roller is more appealing to me as a player but I sometimes see the older horns going for more money. Were there other changes to the true tone around that time that make the later ones less appealing?
 

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Tthe more modern G# is generally considered a plus and a more desirable version (hence more expensive) , in other contemporary horns Buescher introduced (but not in the soprano) also a fron tF.

The the TT type IV are generally more expensive because of that G# feature ( while you think it is the opposite).

adding to older threads only brings more results and keeps information compacted.

Just to mention... I've had a couple of TTs over the years. The best sounding one, well, tied with a beautiful gold plate Series IV I had for a while, was an early curvy with the button G# and keyed to Eb. Just to point out, if you're really going for sound, the earlier button G# instruments are every bit as good an instrument overall, except that little mechanical set back. Which, depending on what you're playing or how you like to practice, may not be a problem. I wouldn't opt for a horn without the high F again, though...
AS Grumps mentioned, the supply is different. I just sold a mint Buescher TT gold plated series IV (the most desired) for $950 whereas I have a TT straight soprano in silver for $1,450. I agree with Grumps on the Buescher Soprano being one of the best. Also these sopranos will cost a bit to redo so looking for a $200 one is next to impossible as there are techs like me who will easily pay $700 for one with a decent finish. In the past 5 years, I don't recall any TT soprano (other than a parts donor) selling for under $500 on ebay.
Both of my TT sops have the roller-style Ab key (and they come from the late 1920's). My TT alto (from the early '20s) has the button-style Ab key. I think that may be a difference among TT sops from various eras of the '20's, but I'm not sure. DAVE
 

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Wondering if anyone has experience with different variations of true tone sopranos. From pictures I can see that the G# key changed at some point in the mid 20s from a typewriter style key to a roller. The roller is more appealing to me as a player but I sometimes see the older horns going for more money. Were there other changes to the true tone around that time that make the later ones less appealing?
Do you ? Because as a refurbisher/seller.....the pearl G# ones are...to put it simply...kryptonite.

Nobody wants those, or those buyers who buy 'em have not done their boning up. I know folks who have tried to sell those and they usually have to remain listed for a VERY long time, or the price dropped to almost absurdly low levels. If someone has managed to sell one for a really good sum, they either have a talent for talking up their horns or the horn finish was in pristine condition.

Just my experience....
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the quick responses, these were my suspicions as well.
Although it might be no problem to play the button G# in most cases, I find that if a horn has a limitation someone will 100% ask me to play that exact limitation on a gig or recording. Apologies for not finding the above quotes the first time around. I did search but didn't find the answer to this specific question.
 

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If you install the G#-C#-B-Bb linkage (which isn't on the roller-G# True Tones, anyway) then the presence or absence of the roller no longer matters.

Are there some TTs that have the round G# button and also have the front F? To me the front F is a much much bigger deal as it's a lont harder to add that key than it is to add the G# linkage.

I believe (needs confirmation) that the old Selmer Super alto and tenor have a pearl button G# AND the G# linkage AND a front F.
 

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I agree that the front F is the main reason for the higher prices. Even so, I find my older ones with the round G# pearl to bring $600+ in good condition and the series III and IV with the front F to be only slightly more, around $900 so go for the later horn. The TTs are a good bargain as there were so many made.
 
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