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I have, a Buescher 400 alto that I've had since I was in the 3rd grade (1978!). Played it all through elementary school, Jr high, and high school. Unfortunately, I stopped playing after high school. Originally It belonged to my uncle who played it when he was in high school, purchased new for him by my grandparents. My uncle passed away back in 1980. So, you can imagine the sentimental value of this horn is immeasurable.

It is a Buescher 400, serial number in the low 36xxxx range with an S-5 stamped under that.

From what I can find so far, this is one of the good ones right?

It needs a bit of an overhaul. What/who would be a good place to trust to overhaul it?


Tom
 

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Tom: I have one of those - the Buescher 400 alto with the top-hat-and-cane engraving. I sent mine to John Frazier several years ago, after he'd done my Big B alto - and a great job on both. But that saxophone is a saxophone before anything else, so I have the opinion that any competent repair-tech can handle the job. Some get excited about the snap-in pads, etc., but I don't.

FWIW, I recently acquired two neat straight sopranos (a MKVI and an old Conn NWII, gifted to me) and I had a local guy, unknown to most everyone except a few of us in my area, overhaul them. He did a wonderful job on them.

I'd look locally first, to avoid having to ship that horn, before getting some whiz-bang tech to do it. DAVE
 

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It appears that your Buescher was made right before the Selmer buy out, but in the gray area. Its probably a good horn. Personally I will never again own a post buyout Buescher. I agree with Dave Dolson that having the original snaps is not important. However if it does have the snaps I would discuss with the tech how they intend to deal with them, because it is a big deal to some.

Recently I bought a Buescher 156 that had a receipt from a long standing repair shop I am familiar with. In each case where a pad was replaced the snap and spud was removed. Now even thought this shop has been in business for 60+ years, they are completely clueless on the value of vintage horns. In fact so clueless that I have flipped several horns that I bought from them. So back to my point, know what you want done with the snaps.
 

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As I understand it that's right around the time of the Selmer USA buyout, I'd expect it to be a great horn. You're in luck, Matt Stohrer is widely held to be one of the best in the business and he's very close to you. His SOTW handle is abadcliche. Hopefully his waiting list is open; if it is, I'd get on it.
 

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I owned one of the early Selmer buyout 400s. It is a fine horn ergonomically, decent sound, but I had to sell it. It just does not quite have the impact of a pro horn. Just my opinion. I would use it only as a backup. But it is not a 'great' horn by any means.
 

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I guess it depends on who's playing it. I bought a new Selmer Buescher 400 tenor in 1964 that really played great. I did go back to Selmer in 1966 but I recently discovered that a R&R record exists with me on it playing the Buescher with a 130/0. I was very satisfied with how it sounded but I was glad to get back to the feel of a MK VI.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXhTXLzyhdA
 
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