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Pretty much what saxoclese said on the general direction of your project. To answer the last question, the small pads that are not snap in won't need any resonators. Especially if the tone holes are very small, it would be very difficult to center them precisely.

Also, this is a post WWII horn so most likely, they were using standard thickness pads in metric diameters, which is the B-60 series at Ferree's tools and you can get a full set even if there are 2 or 3 pads that you won't use as snap ins. Buying that set plus the remaining metal reso pads will be cheaper than ordering all the individual pads.

Renaissance Wax or Fastwax ( www.fastwax.com ) will help with prevention of further corrosion and ease the removal of gunk.

Last not least, if you repad the horn, don't do a partial
 

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"The trick is to find someone who has the right size replacement spuds and is willing to do just that part of a repad/overhaul."

Yeah, that was my point and neither snap on resos or pads are readily available. Also, being a late 60s horn there's no gold at the end of the rainbow. Perhaps a really nice horn after an overhaul but they don't sell for high dollars, so invest wisely or plan to keep it.
Pads are available at Ferree's and they also take custom orders for snaps but it'll probably be cheaper to look for another really beat up horn.
 

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And in this case, given the fact that by this time the 400's had been neutered and bore little to no resemblance to their THC predecessors -and also the fact that one in overhauled, good playing shape only has a market value of perhaps $600...(THIS one is even the 'second redesign' down from that era, so even more of a step down than the first redesign).... the answer is fairly obvious:

Don't pay for installing new snaps, it'd be a waste of $ and would gain absolutely nothing as far as horn performance nor resale-ability. You paid about upper-end scale for what it is worth as a project horn...I would have paid no more than that, and you didn't :|.

Just get snap pads for the remaining snap-spud cups, and use conventional pads for the ones where the spuds have been (wisely and mercifully) removed.

I think Ferrees is the ONLY supplier that STILL offers bona-fide replica snap-in pads (this meaning not only the center holes but the metal backings as well).

MusicMedic will gladly take any of their available pad offerings and punch the center holes larger to fit a Buescher snap spud...just add a special instruction when you are purchasing noting "please punch center holes for Buescher snap-in installation".But MM pads do not have the metal backings, they are just standard pads where you would have to put some shellac in there to install properly. IMHO a much wiser course of action than trying your hand at the bona-fide metal backed pads.

I am NO fan of snap-ins. There is a VERY good reason that techs ground out the spuds for generations when doing repadding...it was not just out of laziness or ignorance. IMHO there is nothing gained by using the metal backed bona fide pads, and it will be a pain in the *** if you have never done it before.
Most folks these days just go with conventional pads with the larger center-hole stamp and use a 'hybrid' method of installing with some shellac/glue (many do not do not a complete conventional 'floating' technique ) and then key bending. I believe there are thread discussions about these techniques if you search for 'em...

(Of course if your goal as a hobbyist repairer is more akin to "I wanna do it the way they did it back in the day/the way the mfr intended the pads to be installed"...just to satiate your curiosity or gve yourself a bit of a challenge...then certainly give it a whirl - why not ?).

If you do not have any red rot or verdgris on the horn, then a soap bath as described above it a good plan. IF there is rot or verdgris, however (and I see red rot), soap will not do the trick and you may wanna run the horn body & neck by a tech so they can chem-bathe or sonic-bathe it....which would NOT be expensive since the horn would already be broken down and they would not have to reassemble it. Then after you get it back hit the body with some hand polish such as Wenol or Maas and a microfibre cloth (do not use Noxon or Brasso - too aggressive) and that will clean it up really nicely.
I respectfully disagree on the difficulty or lack thereof of installing snap in pads. I have heard all kinds of weird rumors about needing to use paper shims behind the pads for leveling them and what not. Arguably, I have only done 2 complete True Tone altos - no glue at all - and it was a breeze. And again, one person's owl is the other person's nightingale but I thought I throw in a little counterbalance because I really believe that a lot of the antipathy against snap ins is based on false rumors and resulting predisposition against them.

Also, apparently, metal backings were not used throughout all iterations of snap in pads, so any pad should in theory work as long as you have a punch set to punch out/enlarge the center hole (I punch through the back using a kitchen plastic cutting boards as counter surface.

And of course, you are right about Noxon, Brasso which cannot be stressed enough!
Happy New Year everybody
 
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