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Here's a PDF of what's supposed to be a 1954 Buescher catalog. It's abbreviated; for instance if you look at the layout for the 400 model saxes, it refers to a special booklet dedicated to those horns.

View attachment 29658
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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Very cool!
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian
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Yes, it's interesting to see who endorsed Bueschers in the gathering dusk of American pro instrument making.

Of course Sigurd Rascher, Tab Smith, half of the Candoli Bros., and 4/5 of the Ellington section are nothing to sneer at. Ted Weems never played a bad note in his life. And millions were about to discover Lawrence Welk's music thru the magic of teevee.

But bands like Griff Williams and Henry King were laughably square even in their heyday of the '30s (when King's saxes played all Conn tenors, btw).
 

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I love seeing these old catalogues, thanks for posting.

But bands like Griff Williams and Henry King were laughably square even in their heyday of the '30s (when King's saxes played all Conn tenors, btw).
I hadn't heard of either of these bands. See what you mean about Williams but I actually dig that cut of King's band doing Small Hotel. Kinda has a narcotizing effect…warm and pleasant with just enough of a beat…love those low reeds...
 

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Thanks for sharing. Very interesting to us Bueschers buffs!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes, it's interesting to see who endorsed Bueschers in the gathering dusk of American pro instrument making.

Of course Sigurd Rascher, Tab Smith, half of the Candoli Bros., and 4/5 of the Ellington section are nothing to sneer at. Ted Weems never played a bad note in his life. And millions were about to discover Lawrence Welk's music thru the magic of teevee.

But bands like Griff Williams and Henry King were laughably square even in their heyday of the '30s (when King's saxes played all Conn tenors, btw).
Ha! Outside the catalog, I've never heard of Henry King's band. Now you've made me want to go find some old track by him, so I can appreciate his High Corniness.

I love looking over old instrument ads from the early and mid 20th C. They are a real window into a window of the music scene in those days. A band like Henry King's might be turgidly square, but packed with supremely competent musicians, and a paying gig -- well it pays!! Working pros would know who was who. I bet the general music loving public wouldn't recognize the names of nine-tenths of the musicians giving endorsements in the old ads - but other musicians would. All disappeared, now.
 

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The first page showed Welk's sax section, among them Orie Amodeo. When I was a kid (1956), I threw the L.A. Herald Examiner newspaper to Orie's small little apartment in WLA. Orie was a nice guy and when he learned that I had just acquired a soprano saxophone (a Conn C), he promptly coached me into a Bb Conn from Sol Betnun's band-instrument operation in Hollywood. I soon moved on and lost track of Orie. But I will never forget him. DAVE
 
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