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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2012
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2,107 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone, I've been on a bit of a hiatus, but had to get back here and share this one.

A buddy of mine has a run of the mill "Royal Artist" by Bruno alto stencil in his shop, but right on the front of the bell is a stamp (not engraving) that reads:

Exchanged for
New Buescher
Elkhart, IND.
8855

Have you ever seen this before? The number is clearly a separate stamp from the rest of it. I can't imagine a music store doing this, and I honestly can't understand why a manufacturer would go to the trouble to stamp this on the bell of a horn. What about 8855??? Strange!

I've got a shaky cell phone photo that I'll add before long, the file upload manager is taking forever to upload it. It's not big, I'm not sure what the delay is...
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2012
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2,107 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
There we go. Again, sorry for the blur. It's actually a nice crisp stamp.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian
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7,107 Posts
Why Buescher did this I don't know, but for a time during the 1920s they actually would take your horn in trade and, I believe, flat out GIVE you a True-Tone fresh out of the warehouse.

My best guess is that it was right after a new model had been rolled out (maybe the front-F and roller-G# horns?) and they wanted to dispose of remaining inventory of older models. But this is only a guess.

This might have been circa 1926, when the new T-Ts were coming in but saxophone sales were starting to plateau. Dealers might've been unable to take more of the old type instruments and the factory had to get rid of them somehow.

What happened to the trade-ins? Buescher presumably reconditioned them and sold them as "certified used." I know Conn did this (but did not do 1:1 exchanges).
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2012
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2,107 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the insights Paul!

The way they worded the stamp certainly gives it a bit of a marketing slant. Can you picture a Conn or Martin floating around with an "Exchanged for a New Buescher" stamp? I guess they were hoping folks would stop and scratch their heads: "Hmm... somebody traded this in for a Buescher? Maybe I need to as well!"

Have you seen any literature regarding this program? I'd love to pass it along to the owner. speaking of which, if I understood my repair tech correctly it is available as-is in case anyone just has to have this for their collection. No idea on the details, but could put a prospective buyer in touch. I thought it was interesting, but nothing I need!
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian
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Have you seen any literature regarding this program?
None unfortunately - I think it was discussed here on the Forum, probably in days now archived (2003? '04?)
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2012
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2,107 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
That's too bad, but when I have yourself and Bruce concurring on the subject, I consider the information pretty reliable!

I've got to wonder if this was something marketed to school programs, retailers, or both? You'd think if it were a retail program, it would have been accompanied by quite a bit of promotional material.

I wonder how they marketed the trade-ins. I can imagine marketing to schools in almost a grab-bag style. "Recondition used alto $XX, brands vary". Wild speculation of course. I might have to dig through the archives...

Thanks again guys.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian
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Conn advertised refurb instruments in brochures mailed out a few times a year. Buescher probably did the same, but I've never seen one.

The Buescher exchange might have been the kind of deal they didn't want to publicize too broadly, in case demand outpaced supply.
 
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