Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,263 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is a kinda different project I finished earlier this week, just thought I'd share. It's actually a clarinet mpc, so hopefully it's ok to post this here. Someone sent a Bay clarinet mpc in last week with a busted tip (a student of his had dropped it), and he did not have the original missing chunk of material that is missing in the first few pictures. This was his old #1 piece and he wanted it fixed, even if it didn't ever play like it would originally again.

I had a spare clarinet mpc lying around that had bigger dimensions all around that this mpc, and so in order to replace the missing chunk, I first filed the rough and angular break points of the broken area to be flat and fairly right-angeled to make a solid point of contact for the new piece to lay in. Then, I cut the tip off of the spare clarinet mpc mentioned above with a hacksaw. Then used calipers to measure the broken area's dimensions and cut/shaved the piece I'd cut off of the spare mpc down to size using a combination of my flex shaft grinding point and hand files. After it was cut down to size and fitted well enough to the area it was to be glued to, I mixed up some JB Weld and put it together. Waited overnight for it to cure and then just filed all the dimensions down to match, filed all the excess JB Weld away, refaced the rails, and filed down the internal areas of the new piece to match the internals of the original side as closely as I could get (i.e. the baffle height and rail thicknesses).

I ended up going with a curve from Andrew Donaldson's clarinet curve finder from the mpc work forum, although I measured a good playing Vandoren B45 and its curve was almost radial so I suppose a radial curve could've worked too. Went with a length of 34, or 17mm, and a tip opening of .050". The curve used on the Bay gives a little more resistance than the radial curve I found on the Vandoren B45, which I'm guessing some classical players might like.

Here are some pictures of the before/after shots. The first 3 shots in this album are the before pics of this piece, and the next 4 shots are the after shots. Thanks for looking. http://s658.photobucket.com/albums/uu309/birdlives1955/
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,319 Posts
Nice work. Do you have a description somewhere of how you repaired the Meyer 6 with the chip in the tip rail?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,263 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Hey Honeyboy,

Thanks for your interest - Actually I don't have that written anywhere, but basically what I did for that one (the Meyer 6) was as follows: Normally, during a reface something most people do is to shape the tip rail/beak to match the profile of a reed as closely as possible. This helps in terms of getting the most efficiency out of the playing surfaces of the mouthpieces because the tip rail (which is based on the beak shape) will be conformed to match up with the parts of the reed that are most important near its tip. When I got that Meyer 6 in, (it was an older NY USA Meyer), the beak must've been shaped originally to match up with old reed cuts or something because it was very different than a new reed shape (the center of the tip poked out a lot when compared with the shape of a modern day Rico reed). Once I shaved the beak to match a reed, so little of the tip chip was left that JB Weld would not stay put after curing when I was refacing the mpc because there wasn't enough material for the JB Weld to grab onto. So, I just went ahead and shaved the tip back a little further from the front, removing all of the chipped area, and then opened it up a little to give some more tip rail material to work with and refaced it as per normal. That way there was no filler substance needed in the end. One thing that has to be watched out for when shaving tips from the front is the tip/window-length relationship - You want to make sure that the length of the window doesn't get shortened too much. In this case (with the Meyer) it turned out fine, although I prefer not to do things that way unless it seems like the only option because it's not the best modus of operandi to shave tips very much from the front if possible for several reasons. I do have a sound clip of that NY USA Meyer 6 after it was finished which is posted here, it's the first mpc in the list of pictured ones with sound clips: http://www.mattmarantz.com/Site/Mouthpieces.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,978 Posts
Nice tip transplant on the clarinet mouthpiece. I hope you type matched the hard rubber so the donor tip will not be rejected.

I have never had too small a chip to hold JB Weld as a filler. I use it all the time for tiny chips.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,319 Posts
Hey Honeyboy,

Thanks for your interest - Actually I don't have that written anywhere, but basically what I did for that one (the Meyer 6) was as follows: Normally, during a reface something most people do is to shape the tip rail/beak to match the profile of a reed as closely as possible. This helps in terms of getting the most efficiency out of the playing surfaces of the mouthpieces because the tip rail (which is based on the beak shape) will be conformed to match up with the parts of the reed that are most important near its tip. When I got that Meyer 6 in, (it was an older NY USA Meyer), the beak must've been shaped originally to match up with old reed cuts or something because it was very different than a new reed shape (the center of the tip poked out a lot when compared with the shape of a modern day Rico reed). Once I shaved the beak to match a reed, so little of the tip chip was left that JB Weld would not stay put after curing when I was refacing the mpc because there wasn't enough material for the JB Weld to grab onto. So, I just went ahead and shaved the tip back a little further from the front, removing all of the chipped area, and then opened it up a little to give some more tip rail material to work with and refaced it as per normal. That way there was no filler substance needed in the end. One thing that has to be watched out for when shaving tips from the front is the tip/window-length relationship - You want to make sure that the length of the window doesn't get shortened too much. In this case (with the Meyer) it turned out fine, although I prefer not to do things that way unless it seems like the only option because it's not the best modus of operandi to shave tips very much from the front if possible for several reasons. I do have a sound clip of that NY USA Meyer 6 after it was finished which is posted here, it's the first mpc in the list of pictured ones with sound clips: http://www.mattmarantz.com/Site/Mouthpieces.html
Thanks for the reply.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,263 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Ha! Good one on the rubber-compound matching. So far, the new tip has not been attacked!

Thanks for the tip on the JB Weld too, it is great stuff.
Nice tip transplant on the clarinet mouthpiece. I hope you type matched the hard rubber so the donor tip will not be rejected.

I have never had too small a chip to hold JB Weld as a filler. I use it all the time for tiny chips.
BTW, no problem Honeyboy.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top