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Discussion Starter #1
hi. last thursday, april 28 i broke my left wrist. a clean break, i'm told. wearing a cast 4-6 wks. it's really a drag not being able to play much! had to cancel/turn down 4 gigs so far. i don't look forward to starting up again with chops in sad shape so i'm going to try to blow a little every day. i "remodeled ' my cast around the thumb so it didn't push against the high d on the alto. the alto seems the easiest to play. i tried clar and sop sax. flute is a no go...can't twist enough. i hope i'm not slowing the healing by doing this. only a few minutes now and then throughout the day. any sax playing orthopods out there?
 

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Better just take it easy with the playing now, as you don't want to take any chances with that wrist.
Best of luck with the recovery!
 

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Listen to a lot of music and do tons of ear training
 

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I broke my right pinky knuckle 4 weeks ago, and finally today my cast is gone.
During all this time I played only tenor, playing from low D to high F, because I had only 3 fingers available on my right hand (thumb, index and major), I played F and E with the same finger (index) and used the major to play D.
But I played only when I couldn't stand the abstinence syndrome of not playing, it's better to leave the bones alone healing in peace.
Good luck and good recovery.
 

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speaking from an experienced bone-breaker (multiple times) from various bike riding adventures, i can say that you'd best be careful to let the bone start healing without moving/shifting it. the reason they cast (or pin) the bones is to immobilize them. if the bone moves, the healing process starts all over again - back to square one. my experiences have taught me that the bone heals relatively quickly (4-6-8 weeks) compared to the time it takes to get the tendons/ligaments stretched back out and the muscles re-strengthened (shrinkage and atrophe from being immobilized). if you add cast time because you get impatient and overconfident, causing the bone to shift, those soft tissues spend even more time going south, requiring even longer rehab after the cast is off. btw, i did this very thing on a wrist break once.
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in short, take it easy and don't push it - give the bone time to heal.
 

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speaking from an experienced bone-breaker (multiple times) from various bike riding adventures, i can say that you'd best be careful to let the bone start healing without moving/shifting it. the reason they cast (or pin) the bones is to immobilize them. if the bone moves, the healing process starts all over again - back to square one. my experiences have taught me that the bone heals relatively quickly (4-6-8 weeks) compared to the time it takes to get the tendons/ligaments stretched back out and the muscles re-strengthened (shrinkage and atrophe from being immobilized). if you add cast time because you get impatient and overconfident, causing the bone to shift, those soft tissues spend even more time going south, requiring even longer rehab after the cast is off. btw, i did this very thing on a wrist break once.
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in short, take it easy and don't push it - give the bone time to heal.
Quoted and highlighted for emphasis! Any soft tissue damage takes forever to heal! Well, at least it feels like it! I think time slows down or something. Spoken by one who has that experience! No broken bones, just tendons and ligaments. Twice! Docs said they wished I would've broken the bones instead.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thanks so much for the advice! i will take it. haven't listened enough for quite a while. i did blow on the alto for 5 min. this a.m. it's hard to leave it alone. i was at a concert in a nearby town and heard dylan cramer on his '27 selmer alto. he has a beautiful sound and i'm inspired once more.
 

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I broke my right wrist at the end of January (luckily I'm left-handed).

I took it mostly easy while in the cast - but kept the hand and fingers moving as much as was comfortable. Didn't strain or stretch anything beyond what was very comfortrable. Keeping things moving has helped with the soft-tissue & strength recovery (still ongoing) now that the cast is off.

I did play tenor a few times while in the cast, but had to avoid clarinet (too much weight on the thumb pulling the wrong direction).

I'd agree to take it easy - but not too easy... don't stay immobilized or regaining movement will take forever. Keep playing as much as you can without straining anything. I type for a living, which also kept things moving, as well as doing the 'twists' that the doc wanted me to do (while in the cast).

Good luck - and hang in there, it will be off before you know it!

I should clarify my break - it was an "intra-articular un-displaced distal radius fracture" (fractured the big bone hear the thumb when I fell down, playing tennis)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, here I am , 4 weeks later. I couldn't stay away from the horns! Only did alto for the first two weeks, and only 15-30 minutes per day. Couldn't fully cover clarinet holes. Last week I managed to get the clarinet going and am feeling more sure each session. I had the cast removed on Friday and am wearing a splint. I can take it off when I want to. Started playing the flute right away. My "orthopod" said it was good to play the instruments. I just didn't push too hard. My wrist is feeling pretty good now. I've been lucky, I guess. A little stress is good for bone healing.
 

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I wish that I had seen this thread earlier.
Firstly, sandy, I am pleased that you recovered but I should have sent out a warning earlier.
I too broke my left wrist, and, like a total idiot, I cut away the plaster to allow me to play the saxophone.
What I failed to realise was that every time I moved my left thumb, the ligament scraped againt a jagged broken bone....inevitably there was a PING & my left thumb fell inwards & I was unable to move it....the ligament had frayed through.
Fortunately nature has provided us (perhaps only sax players :)) with two ligaments to the index finger; surgeons were able to divert one to the inoperative thumb, which leaves me with a thumb and index finger which do not really work to design spec. but do the job.
What a prize clown! [rolleyes]
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for your thoughts and story, Captain. I was lucky! Played my first gig yesterday since the break and felt good, even on clarinet. The wrist is just a taste sore today, but that's probably because I tried to start my lawn mower after a bad batch of gas.
 

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I broke my right wrist in high school. It was the best thing that ever happened to my basketball game. After 4 weeks of playing with a cast, I had some nice moves, you know, fake right and go left.
 
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