Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,870 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
1,210 Posts
Hmm. Great speech. Although a lot of his points seem highly questionable. I take it as humorous and entertaining...less academic or valid. That way I can enjoy it!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian
Joined
·
7,107 Posts
It was actually part of a public debate at Cambridge. Doesn't increase its validity of course, but it is of academic interest. At least British academic interest - over here our students prefer not to think unless they can get credit hours for it.

Heck, I'd listen to Fry talk about wood screws or toilet brushes, he's that entertaining.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Personaly, I love the argument that classical music is special, because you can not dance on it. It's a brilliant remark, in an era where everybody calls for 'dancable' music. It is something to remember in respect to jazz as well. Undancable music can be complex and doesn't suffer from the compulsive need of an audible 'beat'.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian
Joined
·
7,107 Posts
Personaly, I love the argument that classical music is special, because you can not dance on it. It's a brilliant remark, in an era where everybody calls for 'dancable' music. It is something to remember in respect to jazz as well. Undancable music can be complex and doesn't suffer from the compulsive need of an audible 'beat'.
I'm not comfortable with the reverse implication: that jazz you can dance to (say swing) is dumb crap compared to jazz you can't.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2011
Joined
·
1,033 Posts
Ah - I thought I recognised the Union debating chamber. To be honest, the Union is not so much a breeding ground for academics as for politicians.

The point about non danceability is a bit odd when you remember the number of gavottes, chaconnes, hornpipes, minuets, waltzes, mazurkas, polkas, etc represented in the genre. Then there is the small matter of a classical music form called "ballet" - you can't dance to that? Apart from the fact that we've forgotten those dances, isn't it more that people have put classical music on a pedestal where it would be unseemly to dance? It's the equivalent of Goodman moving to Carnegie Hall, Prog Rock heard in reverent silence, and other examples of the dangers of trying to dance when one is disappearing into some orifice or other of one's own.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,870 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I think the point is that there is more to music then just dancing. There is music for listening. I don't think he puts down music you can dance to.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
38,865 Posts
well, in my view, the most interesting point is that the contempt shawn by some (mostly populists , right or left wing alike, ) about " difficult" music is based on the fact that this sort of people easily and snobbishly earmark as elitist and unnecessary all manners of things which they say that they or those who they think they can speak for, the masses, don't understand.

Ease , Stephen Fry says and I agree, in cultural terms is a *****. It is relatively easy to have a carnal congress with a prostitute and all you get is some quick satisfaction (a stiffy as he puts it) but getting to know a refined French woman (and hopefully end up in her or your boudoir :twisted: ) is perhaps more challenging and difficult but you can get a more refined form of satisfaction from it or, dare I say, even true love!

Our last government in Holland has decided to deeply cut into the cultural budget to realise some minor (compared to the size of what they tell us it is necessary for them to save..........but to the benefit of whom?) savings which will bring small relief to the finances of the country but will cause untold damage to the culture of the nation for many many decades to come.

All of this is on the ground that culture is a " leftist hobby" and because of this we have to rid the Dutch people of things they don't understand or , supposedly, want.

this is the Prinsengracht concert (free concert) which happens every year in Amsterdam, if you look at the public they seem to enjoy what they hear and be captivated by it. I don't think this type of music (and culture in general) is a useless form of wasting public money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
I'm not comfortable with the reverse implication: that jazz you can dance to (say swing) is dumb crap compared to jazz you can't.
Honestly; did I make any remark whatsoever in this respect? :cry: Watch the speech of Stephen Fry. First of all he states that he doesn't mean to denounce dancable music or pop music in any way. But it is not the only music that matters.
Leonard B. Meyer has formed a theory how music elicites emotions. (Meyer L.B.,1956; Emotion and Meaning in Music, Chicago Press). "Emotion or affect is aroused when a tendency to respond is arrested or inhibited" (p 14). I can recommend this book, because it is a sincere attempt to explain a lot in music that asks for explanation, whether one agree's or not.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian
Joined
·
7,107 Posts
Honestly; did I make any remark whatsoever in this respect? :cry:
Sorry to mistake you, then. It could have followed logically.

Besides, I often wonder whether jazz fanship might not have its pathological side. There are stereotypes about every kind of music listener.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top