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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

I was wondering your opinions and experiences with the modern plastic Brilhart Ebolins. How would you describe the way they alter your sound? They seem like reasonably neutral mouthpieces, but do they lean toward making you sound a bit brighter or darker?


Thanks guys. I've been looking for a reasonable all-purpose jazz mouthpiece other than a meyer (I don't like how I play on them too much...but that's just me!)

I look forward to reading your responses:) !!!!
 

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I think of them as a rubber Link with a little extra bite and brightness. I think you could get an older one for a good price, but if you decide to get a new one, play test a lot. The sheer amount of differences between two different modern Ebolins will be striking.
 

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The Ebolin that I have is a little 'older'. A mid 70's production if memory serves.
I've used it on an old Bundy and my current Martin Indiana and have found that to me, it's a bit 'brighter' sounding than my Rousseau. I use Hemke reeds if that makes any difference to you.

In my humble opinion it would be a decent 'all purpose Jazz mouthpiece'.
Back when I was just starting out, many, if not most of the alto players were using the Ebolin for concert, marching, and jazz band.
 

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they're fine for whatever you want.
Maceo plays one.
Joe Allard played one.
Two totally different sounds, one mouthpiece.

Runyon model 22's are very similar too, and a great price!
 

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I have used the new ones on both tenor and alto. I like them a lot for the price and playability; however I have never played one of the older ones.
 

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...ive got some nice vintage ones with serial number...if your interested!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Re : Re: Brilhart Ebolin?

The Ebolin that I have is a little 'older'. A mid 70's production if memory serves.
I've used it on an old Bundy and my current Martin Indiana and have found that to me, it's a bit 'brighter' sounding than my Rousseau. I use Hemke reeds if that makes any difference to you.

In my humble opinion it would be a decent 'all purpose Jazz mouthpiece'.
Back when I was just starting out, many, if not most of the alto players were using the Ebolin for concert, marching, and jazz band.
Thanks
Which model Rousseau do you play? I heard that the JDX's edge and brightness made it more suited towards rock than Jazz.
Do you have any other suggestions for an 'all purpose Jazz mouthpiece (besides Meyers)'?
 

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I recently picked up a 4* ebolin (with 6-digit serial number, so must be vintage) for my tenor. I can honestly tell you that it is the warmest, yet somehow modern-sounding, mouthpiece I've ever played. Think Bob Mintzer on his Freddie Gregory. Not too dark, not too bright, very warm, very modern. I freakin' love this piece. Worth every penny in my opinion.
 

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The modern Brilharts aren't bad mouthpieces, but if you can find the vintage Great Neck NY models with the serial # on the side then you've found a true gem.
 

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I'm using a serial-numbered Ebolin 3 on alto now, with a Fibracell 1 1/2 Premiere reed. Great for me - gives me almost a vintage sound. DAVE
 

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In my experience, the Ebolin tenor mouthpieces work better than the alto ones. And the ones that are marked with "Great Neck, NY" are really good.
 

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Don't forget that the new ones can be used as money saving blanks - Phil (sigmund451) does a great job of making sure these are what you want, without hunting for a special one from 1953.
 

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Thanks Click.

I have not worked on the current production pieces but the younger old pieces (if that is a real term) without the serial numbers are still good pieces. A little TLC makes them really a load of fun to play. Its also my experience that a lot of the older pieces (yes, the ones with serial numbers) can use some help too. There were some really wonky ones made. Also, generally tables are not flat. Sometimes the tips are skewed and they benefit from the window being widened a bit.

In terms of being an overall piece I believe a player can cover a lot of turf with a good Ebolin.
 
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